Gist Papers, 1772-1813, MS. 390

A Guide to the Microfilm Edition of the Mordecai Gist Papers
Maryland Historical Society
 
  

(Text converted and initial EAD tagging provided by Apex Data Services, March 1999.)
 

A Guide to the Microfilm Edition of the Mordecai Gist Papers
Maryland Historical Society

Contact Information:
Manuscripts Department
Maryland Historical Society Library
201 West Monument Street
Baltimore MD 21201-4674
410.685.3750
Fax: 410.385.2105
library@mdhs.org
www.mdhs.org



Descriptive Summar

y

A GUIDE TO THE MICROFILM EDITION OF THE Mordecai Gist Papers

MS.390

Maryland Historical Society

Baltimore MD 21201-4674

A MARYLAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY MICROFILM PUBLICATIONSponsored by The Maryland Chapter of the Sons of the Revolution

1975

by

Richard J. Cox

Curator of Manuscripts

 


Introduction

In 1970 the Jacob and Annita France Foundation enabled the Maryland Historical Society to purchase a microfilm camera. The need for a camera was threefold. First, microfilming is an excellent preservation method allowing the retirement of original manuscripts from usage. Second, it is cheaper and easier than xerographic reproduction. And finally, the camera was a prerequisite for grants from the National Historical Publications Commission for microfilm projects. The aim of the NHPC is not only preservation but the wider dissemination of primary source materials to researchers. In this last regard, the Society has been most successful. Within four years it has received five grants with an additional one in cooperation with the Peabody Department of the Enoch Pratt Free Library.

When the Maryland Chapter of the Sons of the Revolution approached the Society with funding for a preservation project, this microfilm edition was suggested and accepted. The only stipulation was that the money be used for Revolutionary War papers. The Mordecai Gist Papers (MS.390) were the logical choice. This collection, although relatively small, is nevertheless one of the most important and hence most used groups of Revolutionary War papers held by the Society. This importance, its fragile condition, and its inadequately organized state encouraged its selection for microfilming.

Many people have aided in this work. Dr. Curtis Carroll Davis of the Maryland Chapter of the Sons of the Revolution and Chairman of the Library Committee of the Society was enthusiastic in supporting this project. Mr. P. William Filby, Director of the Maryland Historical Society, deserves a special thanks for allowing me to devote so much time to it apart from my regular duties. Dr. Edward C. Papenfuse and Miss Phebe Jacobsen of the Maryland Hall of Records were extremely helpful in my research in their institution. Many manuscript curators and librarians across the country aided my search for additional Gist documents. Miss Alice Chin, Assistant Curator of Manuscripts, and Miss Phyllis Thompson, Microfilm Assistant, were essential in the completion of the edition. And finally, Mrs. Vera Ruth Filby critically read this pamphlet.

 

THE MILITARY CAREER OF MORDECAI GIST

In 1776 Mordecai Gist was commissioned a Major only three days after requesting it. A young merchant from Baltimore,

Gist was born in Maryland on February 22, 1742. There is very little information available on Gist prior to the Revolution. The best evidence for his vocation in this period is the Charles Willson Peale portrait executed about 1774; for a description of it see Charles Coleman Sellers, Portraits and Miniatures of Charles Willson Peale (Philadelphia, 1952), 87.

Gist was a member of a Maryland family with a strong military tradition, formed one of the first militia units in Maryland to support the American causes as delineated by the Continental Congress, and studied military tactics. He was a fervent patriot. He had been a leader of the Baltimore delegation involved in the burning of the Peggy Stewart for violation of non-importation and later served on the committee formed for the implementation of non-importation in Baltimore and on the Committee of Observation for Baltimore County. When he decided that he could best serve as a soldier, Mordecai Gist was eagerly accepted by a Maryland government lacking experienced and able military leaders.

During the year he served as commander of the Baltimore Independents, Gist paraded troops and suppressed small riots. For the first six months as a Major in William Smallwood's battalion, his only function was to examine military accoutrement. Had it not been for the scare in Baltimore when the British sloop Otter approached and his involvement in the Eden-Germain affair,

This involved the attempted arrest of Governor Robert Eden of Maryland after some letters of British Colonial Secretary Lord George Germain to Eden were intercepted.

Gist, eager to be that useful citizen, might have resigned. His restlessness was eased when in July 1776 Congress ordered Maryland troops to New York to reinforce Washington's army.

At New York Gist experienced his first combat. The Marylanders, part of Lord Stirling's brigade and utilized as an advance post, skirmished with the British landing troops on Long Island. One week later, on August 27, a major engagement occurred there. Gist, assuming command in Smallwood's absence, helplessly watched the American army crumble as the enemy swept in behind on a poorly guarded road. Remarkably, Gist and his troops retained their position for several hours allowing the bulk of the army to escape. Although some three-fifths of his command were killed or wounded, Gist received praise for his conduct. One man observed I think that melancholy day on Long Island convinced us of the want of Field officers, having none but Major Gist to command us, who behaved as well as Man could do.

James Hindman to Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer, October 12, 1776, William H. Browne, et al., eds., Archives of Maryland (Baltimore, 1883), 12: 344-346.

 

Major Gist again commanded the Maryland detachment from October, when Smallwood was wounded at White Plains, until the end of 1776. These final months of his first campaign were dismal. His greatest problem was not the

enemy but in fielding a force at all. From an original 750 troops Gist had less than 300 by November and by December less than 200. Finally, after the Trenton victory, Gist, now a Colonel, was allowed to return to Maryland to assist in rebuilding his command. Travelling home in the winter cold Gist had little to be optimistic about.

Until April both Smallwood and Gist were unable to recruit. Aided by the British the Loyalists on Maryland's Eastern Shore revolted and in early February Gist was dispatched there to imprison the leaders and break the insurrection. Neither officer was elated by this duty and when the Maryland government considered the possibility of maintaining regular troops there they dissented. Both considered recruiting and procuring supplies as more essential. Hindered by this duty, the dissatisfaction of some veteran officers over promotions, a general shortage of clothing and other military accoutrement, a smallpox epidemic, and poor morale, Gist still succeeded by July in sending 200 new troops to the main army.

When at the end of July 1777 a large British fleet with Philadelphia as its destination was sighted in the Chesapeake Bay, Gist and Smallwood were ordered to command the militiamen called out by Congress. Colonel Gist returned to the Eastern Shore to organize the troops and then lead them to the Head of Elk within a convenient distance to harass and annoy the Enemy's right Flank.

George Washington to Mordecai Gist, August 31, 1777, Gist Papers, MS.390, Maryland Historical Society.

Plagued by a lack of equipment and officers, Gist was unable to move until September 10. By then the British had decidedly defeated the Americans at Brandywine, and he was reordered to attack the enemy's rear to allow Washington to regroup. For a week Gist and Smallwood acted separately, neither too effectively. Fearing that the Marylanders might be cut off, Washington directed them to join him as soon as possible. Gist and Smallwood formed together and hurried to fall in with General Anthony Wayne's division. Just prior to reaching Wayne the British routed Wayne's troops which also panicked the Maryland militiamen. Gist, managing to re-form his troops, covered the rear of the retreating Americans. In this exposed position Gist was ambushed and narrowly escaped injury: my Horse received two Balls through his Neck but fortunately only fell on his Knees and Hams otherwise I must have received the Bayonet or fallen into their Hands.

Mordecai Gist to John Smith, September 23, 1777, Emmet Collection No. 6610, Manuscripts and Archives Division, The New York Public Library, Astor Lenox and Tilden Foundation.

Several days later the Marylanders caught up with Washington.

With the main army Gist participated in the battle at Germantown on October 4, 1777. Here, according to Gist, his troops behaved with a degree of Courage becoming the oldest Veterans. The defeat Gist attributed to the Weakness of the Human Heart, the ability of the British commander, and a heavy fog as if.

designed by Providence to favor the British Army.

Mordecai Gist to John McClure, October 10, 1777, M. Gist Letterbook, Myers Collection, NYPL.

Despite this Gist remained in a good humor. He cheerfully wrote to a friend that he possessed a tollerable State of Health-have plenty of Ghizim, my Spirits neither depressed nor elevated, my time glides smoothly on and each revolving Sun Shines out to make me happier in the defense of Virtue and my Country.

Mordecai Gist to Ezekiel Forman, October 30, 1777, Letterbook, NYPL.

 

During the final months of 1777 Gist's revolving Sun disappeared behind clouds. At White Marsh his time was occupied with discharges, promotions, supplies, and deserters. Angered by the promotion of an officer who had never been Subjected... to the Hazzard of his life in the Field [preventing] his displaying such Military talents as can Justify upon a proper Principle such Recommendation or Appointment,

Mordecai Gist to John McClure, November 19, 1777, Letterbook, NYPL.

Gist considered retirement. His attitude did not improve when the campsite was changed to Valley Forge. He could not understand why a location had been selected which allowed the enemy to forage and harass at will and subjected the troops to damp huts and diseases. Gist thought the army should be removed to Germantown where the soldiers would bear the loss of Constitution through the Winter Campaign with some degree of Cheerfulness.

Mordecai Gist to John McClure, December 16, 1777, Letterbook, NYPL.

 

Colonel Mordecai Gist did not share in the suffering he prophesied. A widower for nearly a decade, Gist married Mary Sterett of Baltimore in late January 1778. To remarry in the midst of a war was a difficult decision. Only several months before he had advised a fellow officer to consider marriage carefully: The Enchanting pleasures of Venus can never stand in competition with God like Mars when the Soldier has Virtue enough to remember his Country.

Mordecai Gist to John Steward, June 13, 1777, Maryland Box, Maryland Troops Folder, NYPL.

For his own situation Gist was correct. Returning to camp after a brief stint of recruiting, Gist's separation from his young bride produced a gloomy Indisposition of mind.

Mordecai Gist to Mrs. Mary Gist, August 9, 1778, Revolutionary War Collection, MS.1814, MHS.

To make matters worse in September he learned that his pregnant wife was seriously ill. Unable to return immediately he complained about the sacrifices of his profession. Finally arriving at Baltimore in October he remained with his wife until May. The birth of a son and a promotion to Brigadier General in January 1779 lessened the weight of his sacrifices.

For the remainder of the year Mordecai Gist was in good spirits. He wrote to a friend that the British do not dare to come forth to Battle with us in the field

and even predicted a general peace.

Mordecai Gist to William Hammond, September 29, 1779; Mordecai Gist to?, September 29, 1779, Letterbook, NYPL.

Satisfied that peace would develop soon Gist had his business associates endeavoring to locate for him a good farm. In April 1780, however, General Washington ordered the Delaware regiment and the Maryland Line to South Carolina to reinforce the army there. For Gist the next two years would be the hardest and most eventful in his military career.

In the South Gist participated in the engagement at Camden on August 16, 1780. When the militia retreated, Gist and Smallwood with a small force withstood for a short time the entire British army. Both were thanked by Congress for their bravery and good conduct.

Worthington C. Ford, et al., eds., Journals of the Continental Congress, 34 vols. (Washington, D.C.: 1903-1937), 18:924.

Gist told Congress that the Sentiments contain'd in this Resolve are truly Flattering to a Soldier who is conscious of doing nothing more than his Duty. The pleasure I must ever feel in the discharge of that, can only be Augmented by the Approbation of those who have Honor'd me with their Confidence.

Mordecai Gist to the President of Congress, October 24, 1780, Gist Family Papers, Library of Congress.

This was the highpoint of his career.

Camden was General Gist's last combat action for over a year. In late September Horatio Gates sent Gist back to Baltimore to recruit. When Nathanael Greene succeeded to the head of Southern department in October, he placed the supervision of procuring men and supplies in Maryland and Delaware in Gist's hands. The fall of Charleston in May 1780 and the defeat at Camden had nearly ended organized resistance in the South. Men such as Gist were indispensable if the South was to be recovered.

Gist arrived at Baltimore aware of the importance of his efforts. In a long letter to a Virginia legislator Gist wrote that the present period is critical and may involve the Southern States in the most imminent danger, their situation requires the most spirited exertions to counteract the designs of a barbarous, cruel Army. Because of this he was critical of Virginia continuing to enlist men for eighteen months; this caused an unnecessary Tax on the people and was ruinous to the Continental Army for as soon as these soildiers learned the common duties of a Military life, their time expires. The result of such practices was a relaxation of Discipline, which must even be followed by misfortune and Disgrace in Action. Can it be supposed, he continued, that by raising Recruits and giving them the name of regular Troops, they shall at once become metamorphosed into Veterans, and inspired with a confidence to oppose an equal number of experienced Troops at the point of the Bayonet?. Gist was certain that such recruiting also produced poor morale. Supplied with

inferior soldiers, the army could not exact success and for a soldier success alone is merit.

Mordecai Gist to Robert Munford, October 24, 1780, MS.390, MHS.

 

Faced with gathering 2000 troops, Gist designed a new system of recruitment. The population of Maryland was to be divided into equal (according to property) classes. A class would furnish one representative. If this man was killed or deserted, his class would supply another. General Gist predicted a number of advantages in this plan. First, there would be a constant number of troops in the field. Second, it would engage every Citizen to be equally interested in the Success of our Arms or event of an Action. Third, it would discourage inferior recruits in whose Services or Integrity no confidence can be placed. Forth, it would prevent the harbouring and concealing [of] Deserters. And, finally, it would give respectability to our line, and... general satisfaction to the good people of Maryland.

Mordecai Gist to the President of the Committee Appointed to Take into Consideration the Requisition of Major General Greene, October 1780, MS.390, MHS.

 

Gist presented this plan to the Maryland legislature in October but not until February 1781 was it adopted. Although he had great faith in the class system, others did not share his optimism. Washington did not believe it would work. A Maryland officer, Colonel Peter Adams, thought the legislature did not want to raise troops but rather to throw the Burthen of the war on the shoulders of any Other state.

Peter Adams to Mordecai Gist, January 12, 1781, MS.390, MHS.

In retrospect Adams' pessimistic estimation appears the better assessment. Although the plan appeared fine on paper the recruiting service did not substantially improve. In May, only two months after the bill's passage, General Greene complained of Maryland's lack of concern to provide troops even when their own state was endangered. Gist could not even establish locations for the recruits to rendezvous.

Recruiting was not the only responsibility that harassed Mordecai Gist. Controversies over rank, resignations, requests of all kinds, supervision of troop transports to the South, even a controversy with the legislature over jurisdiction of an artillery company added to Gist's problems. Of all these problems the most serious was a lack of money which personally affected Gist. He wrote to Governor Thomas Sim Lee that he had been using his own money for military operations and now found himself largely indebted for the Support of my Table.

Mordecai Gist to Thomas Sim Lee, August 7, 1781, State Papers, Brown Books, III, 72-73, Maryland Hall of Records.

Not surprisingly these duties wearied Gist. In March he wrote of a long and tedious Indisposition.

Mordecai Gist to Nathanael Greene, March 28, 1781, MS.390, MHS.

Even by May his condition had not substantially improved.

Shortly before the British surrender, Gist appeared at Yorktown with a

considerable force. For Gist the surrender was the highlight of his military career. I feel my happiness augmented, he wrote, by having had the honor to become one of the Generals commanding in the Trenches for the three last days of the Seige and particularly so when I reflect that the Surrender of Cornwallis and his Army must establish our Independence and pave the way to an honorable peace. While there Gist visited General Cornwallis and recorded his impressions: His defense of the post was not so obstinate as might be expected from an experienced and determined Officer.

Mordecai Gist to John Sterett, October 12, 1781, MS.390, MHS.

 

Although he thought peace was near, Gist along with troops from Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia headed southward to join Greene in the Carolinas. Endeavoring to strengthen his command, he faced the old problems of lack of supplies and men. He was certain, however, that his foremost difficulty was a countryside so much ravaged that it was impracticable to forage.

Mordecai Gist to John Sterett, April 12, 1782, MS.390, MHS.

With the summer came increased illnesses. Despite the poor condition of his light infantry, Gist was assigned the duty of protecting the right flank of the Southern army and to strike at them [the British] wherever you may find them.

William Pierce, Jr. to Mordecai Gist, August 23, 1782, MS.390, MHS.

However, brief skirmishes and the capture of an enemy galley loaded chiefly with foodstuffs were the extent of his activity.

By the early fall of 1782 the disagreeable weather had finally affected Gist himself. Ordered to remain at Kiawah Island to recover, he had not even a surgeon to attend him. By mid-November he hoped to return to duty, but, in fact, was also beginning to look forward to his retirement. When the British finally evacuated Charleston in December 1782 he was still too unwell to continue his command. Because of his condition he was given the relatively easy command at James Island outside of Charleston. At the end of July he left South Carolina and in November 1783 officially retired from the military.

Although he briefly sought a political office in Maryland and was a charter member of the Maryland chapter of the Society of the Cincinnati, Gist, by 1784 was a resident in Charleston where he remained until his death. In early 1784, a widower for several years, he married Mrs. Mary Cattell of that city. His final years, obscured by the paucity of records, were largely consumed by his duties as a Mason

Gist was Deputy Grand Master from 1787 to 1789 and Grand Master from 1790 to 1791.

and his business affairs. On August 2, 1792 Mordecai Gist died leaving behind a considerable estate

A copy of his will and inventory are in the Gist Family Papers, MS.2003, MHS.

and a grateful country.

 


Biographical Essay

Although Mordecai Gist is important enough to merit inclusion in the Dictionary of American Biography, he has remained virtually unstudied. There are several fine genealogies on the Gist family which highlight Mordecai Gist. The best genealogy is Jean Muir Dorsey and Maxwell Jay Dorsey, Christopher Gist of Maryland and Some of His Descendants, 1679-1957 (Chicago, 1958). Wilson Gee, The Gist Family of South Carolina and Its Maryland Antecedents (Charlottesville, 1934) is also a good study. Several of Gist's relatives have been written about, and these essays display the military tradition of the family. Christopher Gist, a friend of George Washington, has had several studies by David B. Trimble, Christopher Gist and the Indian Service in Virginia, 1757-1759, Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 64 (April 1956), 143-165, and Christopher Gist and Settlement on the Monogahela, 1752-1754, Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 63 (January 1955), 15-27. Lawrence A. Orrill, Christopher Gist and His Sons, Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine, 15 (August 1932), 191-218, and Howard H. Peckham, Thomas Gist's Indian Captivity 1758-1759, Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, 80 (July 1956), 285-211, will also interest anyone studying Mordecai Gist and his family.

As with Gist, the military contribution of Maryland during the Revolutionary War has been neglected. The only general study of this particular aspect is Esther Mohr Dole, Maryland During the American Revolution (privately printed, 1941). The military activities of the colonial period are treated in Paul H. Giddens, The French and Indian War in Maryland 1753 to 1776, Maryland Historical Magazine, 30 (December 1935), 281-310, and Louis Dow Scisco, Evolution of Colonial Militia in Maryland, Maryland Historical Magazine, 35 (June 1940), 166-177. The development of the militia system in 1775-1776 is the topic of a chapter in David Curtis Skaggs, Roots of Maryland Democracy 1735-1776 (Westport, Connecticutt, 1973), 156-173. Maryland's part in several campaigns is studied by G. Harlan Wells, The British Campaign of 1777 in Maryland Prior to the Battle of the Brandywine, Maryland Historical Magazine, 33 (March 1938), 3-13, and Lucy Leigh Bowie, Maryland Troops in the Battle of Harlem Heights, Maryland Historical Magazine, 43 (March 1948), 1-21. For an analysis of the socio-economic origins of Maryland's enlisted man, see Edward C. Papenfuse and Gregory A. Stiverson, General Smallwood's Recruits: The Peacetime Career of the Revolutionary War Private, William and Mary Quarterly, series 3, 30 (January 1973), 117-132. For recruiting practices consult Arthur J. Alexander, How Maryland Tried to Raise Her Continental Quotas, Maryland Historical Magazine, 42 (September 1947), 184-196, and Jean H. Vivian, Maryland Land Bounties During the Revolutionary and Confederate Periods, Maryland Historical Magazine, 61 (September 1966), 231-256. Several Maryland officers have been subjects of biographical sketches such as Homer Bast, Tench Tilghman-Maryland Patriot, Maryland Historical Magazine, 42

(June 1947), 71-94, and Cary Howard, John Eager Howard, Maryland Historical Magazine, 62 (September 1967), 300-317. For lists of Maryland officers and a short overview of the Maryland Line, see Rieman Steuart, A History of the Maryland Line in the Revolutionary War, 1775-1783 (Towson, Maryland, 1969). A particularly valuable source for a study of the Maryland Line is Thomas Balch, ed., Papers Relating Chiefly to the Maryland Line During the Revolution (Philadelphia, 1857). There are a number of unpublished studies that touch upon Maryland and the military; for these consult Dorothy M. Brown and Richard R. Duncan, comps., Master Theses and Doctoral Dissertations on Maryland History, Maryland Historical Magazine, 63 (December 1968), 412-419 and 64 (Spring and Summer 1969), 65-73, 161-168; a more complete listing was done in 1970 and is available for $2.00 from the Society.

 


Description of the Papers and Roll Inventory

The Mordecai Gist Papers consist of over 700 documents, mostly letters, both to and from Gist. There are also proceedings of courts martial, weekly and monthly regimental returns, muster rolls, accounts, officers' lists, guard reports, and orderly and account books. The papers range in date from 1774 to within several months of his death in 1792.

The greatest value of this collection lies in its information on the military operations of the Revolutionary War. Over three-quarters of the collection falls within the years of 1781-1783 and thus reflects Gist's involvement in the Southern Campaign. Although Gist was not an outstanding military strategist or theorist, he was a capable field commander who was not afraid to express his opinions concerning the conduct of the war. Of immense importance are letters to and from such figures as George Washington, William Smallwood, Horatio Gates, Thomas Sim Lee, Baron Von Steuben, and Nathanael Greene.

The obvious lack in the collection is its documentation of Gist's personal life. Although there are some manuscripts which demonstrate his involvement in the Masons and the Society of the Cincinnati, there is very little else apart from his military duties. In a few letters he writes of his personal life, family, or health, but this does not appear to have been a typical subject for him.

The organization of the papers has been chronological. The collection had originally been mounted in four volumes with a rough organization according to subject and date. It was a weak system that, for one, separated the enclosures from the original letters. At the end of the collection there is a special grouping of orderly and account books, which range in date from 1779 to 1783, and one of undated documents. The following roll inventory is also the order of filming.

 


The Gist Papers

The Mordecai Gist Papers (MS.390) were donated to the Maryland Historical Society in three installments by Dr. J. Paul Cockey. In early 1850 he presented several orderly books and some miscellaneous documents; in July 1855 and January 1856 he gave the remainder of the collection. How Dr. Cockey acquired these papers is not known for certain. Gist's mother was Susannah Cockey and possibly the documents came into Dr. Cockey's hands through this connection. The Cockeys were extremely proud of the General, and a number of their sons were named after him.

This collection is the largest pertaining to Mordecai Gist held by any historical agency. The Society also has numerous other materials on the family (nine separate collections), although MS.390 is the only one with Mordecai Gist papers. Both the Maryland Hall of Records and the Library of Congress have small Gist family collections which contain some Mordecai Gist correspondence. There are a considerable number of Gist letters in the Library of Congress' Washington Papers, but the majority of these have been published in John C. Fitzpatrick, ed., The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources 1745-1799, 39 vols. (Washington, D. C., 1931-1944). The New York Public Library owns a Gist letterbook covering the years 1777 to 1779, and other than the Society's this letterbook (with nearly 100 letters) is the most important Gist manuscript collection. There is a transcript of this letterbook in the Peter Force Papers at the Library of Congress.

In addition to the Mordecai Gist Papers, the Maryland Historical Society owns a number of other collections containing records on the military aspects of the American Revolution. Most abundant are muster rolls, payrolls, returns, accounts, and officers' lists. The most significant collections relating to the Maryland Line are the Otho Holland Williams Papers (MS.908) and Otho Holland Williams Accounts (MS.908.1, 908.2), the extensive papers of a fellow officer of Gist's, and the Revolutionary War Collection, MS.1814, which has a wealth of material on the regular army and militia units of Maryland. There are many papers of important figures of Maryland during the Revolution; for these refer to Avril J. M. Pedley, comp., The Manuscript Collections of the Maryland Historical Society (Baltimore, 1968) and the recent accessions lists published regularly in the Maryland Historical Magazine.

The Maryland Hall of Records also houses a considerable amount of papers relating to Maryland's military role in the Revolution. The most important are in the Maryland State Papers, Red Book and Brown Book series, and Executive Papers. Many of these have been published in William H. Browne, et al., eds., Archives of Maryland, 72 volumes (Baltimore, 1883-1972). The Hall of Records has also published several excellent calendars to their collections.

 


Roll Inventory

For any variations to this inventory caused by filming see Technical Notes at the beginning of each roll.

 

 

 

 

Roll I

1774

 

 

Dec. 3 We the Baltimore Independent Cadets.... (signed by Gist and others)

 

 

 

 

1775

 

 

Feb. 14 To the Gentlemen of the Baltimore Independent Company from Agamemnone

 

 

 

 

1776

 

 

Jan. 3 Delegates of Maryland to Mordecai Gist (printed)

 

 

 

Dec. 2 Delegates of Maryland to Richard Cromwell (printed)

 

 

 

 

1777

 

 

Feb. 16-17 Proceedings of a Brigade Court Martial

 

 

 

March 12 G[eorge] Washington to Mordecai Gist

 

 

 

April 4 Resolves of Congress concerning Commissions (printed)

 

 

 

April 5 W[illia]m Sterett to [Mordecai Gist]

 

 

 

April 19 A List of the Officers of the Third Maryland Regiment

 

 

 

Aug. 31 G[eorge] Washington to Mordecai Gist

 

 

 

Nov. 19 Proceedings of a Regimental Court Martial

 

 

 

Nov. 28 Proceedings of a Brigade Court Martial

 

 

 

Dec. 2 Court of Inquiry

 

 

 

Dec. 27 Proceedings of a Brigade Court Martial

 

 

 

 

1778

 

 

Feb. 13 Proceedings of a Brigade Court Martial

 

 

 

Feb. 16 Proceedings of a General Court Martial

 

 

 

Feb. 17 Proceedings of a General Court Martial

 

 

 

Feb. 19 Proceedings of a General Court Martial

 

 

 

Feb. 23 Proceedings of a General Court Martial

 

 

 

March 24 Proceedings of a General Court Martial

 

 

 

March 26 Proceedings of a Court Martial

 

 

 

March 28 Proceedings of a General Court Martial

 

 

 

March 31 Proceedings of a General Court Martial

 

 

 

April 6 Proceedings of a General Court Martial

 

 

 

April 7 Proceedings of a General Court Martial

 

 

 

May 6 Proceedings of a Court Martial

 

 

 

May 7 Proceedings of a Court Martial

 

 

 

May 19 Proceedings of a General Court Martial

 

 

 

May 19 Continental Navy Board to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 26 Proceedings of a General Court Martial

 

 

 

May 31 Proceedings of a General Court Martial

 

 

 

Sept. 13 W[illia]m Sterett to Mordecai Gist

 

 

 

Sept. 20 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Brigade of Foot

 

 

 

Oct. 24 Proceedings of a Brigade Court Martial

 

 

 

Nov. 6 Proceedings of a Brigade Court Martial

 

 

 

 

1779

 

 

Jan. 1 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

Jan. 8 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

Jan. 11 W[illia]m Carmichael to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 15 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

Jan. 15 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Brigade of Foot

 

 

 

Jan. 17 W[illiam] Smallwood to Mordecai Gist

 

enclosure: Dec. 30, 1778 Small-wood to George Washington

 

 

 

Jan. 18 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Brigade of Foot

 

 

 

Jan. 21 Sam[uel] Sterett to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 22 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Brigade of Foot

 

 

 

Jan. 22 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

Jan. 29 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

Jan. 30 Monthly Return of the Second Brigade of Foot

 

 

 

Feb. 4 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Brigade of Foot

 

 

 

Feb. 4 Return of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

Feb. 12 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

Feb. 13 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Brigade of Foot

 

 

 

Feb. 14 Orders for a Month's Commands, Middle Brook Camp

 

 

 

Feb. 18 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Brigade of Foot

 

 

 

Feb. 19 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

Feb. 22 Return of the Men Enlisted in the Sixth Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

Feb. 26 Monthly Return of the Second Maryland Brigade of Foot

 

 

 

March 4 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

March 11 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

March 11 Weekly Return of the Sixth Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

March 18 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

March 26 Weekly Return of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

April 21 A List of the Sick and Orderlies of the Second Maryland Brigade

 

 

 

June 9 Muster Roll of Capt. John Davidson's Company of Foot, Second Maryland Regiment

 

 

 

June 17 Return of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot

 

 

 

 

1780

 

 

April 24 Warrant of the Masons to Mordecai Gist, Otho Holland Williams, and Archibald Anderson

 

 

 

Sept. 12 Mordecai Gist to Gov. Caesar Rodney

 

 

 

Sept. 21-Oct. 21 Copy of the Resolves of Congress

 

 

 

Oct. 12 Anthony Singleton to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Oct. 22 Mordecai Gist to A[lexander] L[awson] Smith

 

 

 

Oct. 23 Proceedings of a General Court Martial

 

 

 

Oct. 24 M[ordecai] Gist to Robert Munford

 

 

 

Oct. 26 M[ordecai] Gist to [Horatio] Gates

 

 

 

Oct. 26 M[ordecai] Gist to [George] Washington (enclosures missing)

 

 

 

Nov. 10 Requisitions made to the State of Maryland

 

 

 

Nov. 13 G[eorge] Washington to Mordecai Gist

 

 

 

Nov. 14 M[ordecai] Gist to [Thomas Sim] Lee

 

 

 

Nov. 24 M[ordecai] Gist to George Washington

 

 

 

Nov. 28 J. Patten to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Nov.? Requisition made of the State of Delaware for the use of the Southern Army by Major General Greene

 

 

 

Dec. 5 M[ordecai] Gist to [Nathanael] Greene

 

 

 

Dec. 5 M[ordecai] Gist to Baron Von Steuben

 

enclosure: Oct. 1780 M[ordecai] Gist to the President of the Committee Appointed to Take into Consideration the Requisition of Major Greene

 

 

 

Dec. 17 Baron Von Steuben to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Dec. 20 John Davidson to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Dec. 21 Mordecai Gist to Baron Von Steuben

 

 

 

? State of Maryland to M[ordecai] Gist, Account of Depreciation

 

 

 

? An Estimate of the Quota of Troops to be Raised by the State of Maryland

 

 

 

 

1781

 

 

Jan. 2 G[eorge] Washington to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 3 Chris[tophe]r Richmond to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 4 Rich[ar]d McCallister to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 9 [Ludowick] Weltner to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 10 John Davidson to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 11 Dan[ie]l Carroll to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 11 Edward Oldham to [Mordecai] Gist

 

enclosures: Dec. 18, 1780 Officers of the Maryland Line to Nathanael Greene; Dec. 18, 1780 Nath[anael] Greene to the Officers of the Maryland Line

 

 

 

Jan. 11 U[riah] Forrest to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 12 P[eter] Adams to [Mordecai] Gist (enclosures missing)

 

 

 

Jan. 15 Chevalier D'Anmours to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 16 U[riah] Forrest to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 16 M[ordecai] Gist to the Governor and Council of Maryland

 

 

 

Jan. 20 Thomas Clagett to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 23 Baker Johnson to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 25 Ja[mes] Brice to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 27 M[ordecai] Gist to Donaldson Yates

 

 

 

Jan. 29 M[ordecai] Gist to Governor [Caesar] Rodney

 

 

 

Jan. 30 Donaldson Yates to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 31 Geo[rge] Murdock to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 2 Resolves of the Assembly of Maryland

 

 

 

Feb. 3 Ja[mes] Brice to [William] Brown

 

 

 

Feb. 6 P[eter] Adams to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 8 Henry Gaither to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 8 W[illia]m Kennan to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 8 M[ordecai] Gist to [Thomas Sim] Lee

 

 

 

Feb. 8 Tho[mas] S[im] Lee to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 11 [Ludowick] Weltner to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 12 M[ordecai] Gist to [Thomas Sim] Lee

 

 

 

Feb. 13 B[aker] Johnson to [Mordecai] Gist

 

enclosure: A List of the Mens names delivered by Colo. B. Johnson to Capt. Thos. Lansdale at the request of Genl. Gist.

 

 

 

Feb. 13 Tho[mas] S[im] Lee to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 14 J[ohn] Randall to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 14 M[ordecai] Gist to [William] Brown

 

 

 

Feb. 14 P[eter] Adams to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 14 Don[aldson] Yates to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 14 M[ordecai] Gist to [Nathanael Greene]

 

 

 

Feb. 17 Ben[jamin] Ford to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 20 John Steward to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 21 Rich[ar]d McCallister to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 22 J[ohn] Randall to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 23 Lud[owick] Weltner to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 23 U[riah] Forrest to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 24 John Steward to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 26 Tho[ma]s S[im] Lee to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 27 [Mordecai Gist] to [Thomas Sim] Lee

 

 

 

Feb.? Report of a Committee of the Assembly of Maryland

 

 

 

March 1 Nath[aniel] Ramsay to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 3 Donaldson Yates to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 5 M[ordecai] Gist to Marquis de Lafayette

 

 

 

March 7 [Mordecai Gist] to Marquis de Lafayette

 

 

 

March 10 William Murdock to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 13 John Hamilton to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 13 P[eter] Adams to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 15 David Lynn to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 18 James Armstrong to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 18 John Eccleston to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 19 J[ohn] H[oskins] Stone to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 20 Ben[jamin] Ford to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 22 Alexander Roxburgh to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 23 Tho[mas] Price to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 24 Thomas Person to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 26 U[riah] Forrest to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 28 M[ordecai] Gist to [Nathanae] Greene

 

enclosures: March 28 Return of Troops at Baltimore, Annapolis and Delaware State; March 25 Extract of a letter from Lafayette

 

 

 

March 28 U[riah] Forrest to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 30 Nath[anael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March? Return of the French and British Ships, Rhode Island

 

 

 

March? List of the Officers of the Maryland Continental Troops

 

 

 

April 1 M[ordecai] Gist to [Thomas Sim] Lee (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

April 4 [William Smallwood] to [Mordecai] Gist (incomplete)

 

 

 

April 6 W[illiam] Smallwood to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

April 7 Tho[mas] Price to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

April 7 M[ordecai] Gist to [William] Smallwood

 

 

 

April 9 John Davidson to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

April 9 Thomas Person to [Mordecai] Gist (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

April 15 Ben[jamin] Ford to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

April 17 John Sears to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

April 24 J[ames] Govane to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 1 Nath[anael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 5 John Davidson to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 7 Rich[ar]d Dallam to Mordecai Gist

 

 

 

May 7 W[illiam] Smallwood to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 12 John B. Cutting to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 19 John Swan to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 25 Certificate from Joseph Nourse, Adjutant General, to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 28 Arthur Walker to [Mordecai Gist?]

 

 

 

May 28 [Mordecai] Gist to [Nathanael Greene]

 

 

 

June 1 Arrangement of the Maryland Line

 

 

 

June 2 Donaldson Yates to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 27 John Gale to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

July 9 W[illiam] Smallwood to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

July 30 S[amuel] Sterett to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 5 Account of General Gist's Expenditures on Command in Maryland

 

 

 

Aug. 5 M[ordecai] Gist to [William] Smallwood

 

 

 

Aug. 7 M[ordecai] Gist to David Pore

 

 

 

Aug. 11 M[ordecai] Gist to James Wood (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

Aug. 20 William Fitzhugh to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 22 W[illia]m McKennan to Mordecai Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 26 M[ordecai] Gist to W[illiam] McKennan

 

 

 

Sept. 4 M[ordecai] Gist to George Washington

 

enclosure: French Ships

 

 

 

Sept. 5 D[avid] Humphreys to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Sept. 6 M[ordecai] Gist to [George] Washington

 

 

 

Sept. 7 G[eorge] Washington to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Sept. 8 M[ordecai] Gist to [Thomas Sim] Lee

 

 

 

Sept. 10 Tho[ma]s S[im] Lee to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Sept. 17 M[ordecai] Gist to [Samuel] Montgomery

 

 

 

Oct. 2 M[ordecai] Gist to [Thomas Sim] Lee

 

 

 

Oct. 21 [Mordecai] Gist to John Sterett (enclosures missing)

 

 

 

Oct. 23 A Weekly Return of the Fourth Regiment

 

 

 

Oct. 26 Charles Carroll [of Carrollton] to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Nov. 2 A True State of the Third Maryland Regiment....

 

 

 

Nov. 14 M[ordecai] Gist to [William] Smallwood (enclosures missing)

 

 

 

Dec. 5 R[ichar]d Bird to [Mordecai] Gist

 

enclosure: A Return of the Maryland and Delaware Troops at Williams Burgh and Hanover Hospitals

 

 

 

Dec. 12 Ar[thur] St. Clair to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

? Report of a Committee of the Maryland Assembly

 

 

 

1780-1781 U.S. in Account with M[ordecai] Gist for Contingent Expenses]

 

 

 

 

1782

 

 

Jan. 1 List of Officers

 

 

 

Jan. 4 Maj. [?] Moore to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 5 A Return of the Officers belonging to the First Maryland Regiment

 

 

 

Jan. 5 A Return of the Maryland Artillery in the Southern Army

 

 

 

Jan. 6 Weekly Return of the Third and Fourth Maryland Regiments of Foot

 

 

 

Jan. 8 F. Tate to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 16 [William Smallwood] to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 20 A Weekly Return of the First Maryland Regiment

 

 

 

Jan. 20 A List of the Men on Extra Service and Belonging to the First Maryland Regiment

 

 

 

Jan. 25 John Trueman to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 3 M[ordecai] Gist to Charles Carroll [of Carrollton]

 

 

 

Feb. 4 James Arthur to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 5 N[athanael] Pendleton to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 8 Capt. [?] Roberts to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 8 [James Arthur] to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 10 M[ordecai] Gist to [Thomas Sim] Lee

 

 

 

Feb. 10 M[ordecai] Gist to [William] Smallwood

 

 

 

Feb. 10 M[ordecai] Gist to Legh Masters (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

Feb. 16 M[ordecai] Gist to [William] Smallwood (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

Feb. 17 O[tho] H[olland] Williams to [Josiah] Harmar

 

 

 

Feb. 19 M[ordecai] Gist to [Peter] Adams (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

Feb. 22 M[ordecai] Gist to [Peter] Adams

 

 

 

Feb. 27 Resolves of the British House of Commons

 

 

 

March 4 Resolves of the British House of Commons

 

 

 

March 10 M[ordecai] Gist to [Benjamin] Lincoln

 

enclosure: Proceedings of a Board of Officers Respecting the Rank of Captains Orendoff and Smith Feb. 16, 1782

 

 

 

March 12 M[ordecai] Gist to [Nathanael] Greene

 

 

 

March 21 John Rudolph to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 28 Tho[ma]s S[im] Lee to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

April 2 Alex[ander] Frazir to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

April 4 M[ordecai] Gist to Alex[ander] Frazir

 

 

 

April 5 M[ordecai] Gist to [William] Smallwood (enclosures missing)

 

 

 

April 10 M[ordecai] Gist to J[ohn] Sterett

 

 

 

April 12 W[illia]m Browne to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

April 15 M[ordecai] Gist to [Benjamin] Lincoln

 

 

 

April 18 [William] Wilmott to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

April 19 Report of the Different Guards at Camp Bacon's Bridge

 

 

 

April 22 M[ordecai] Gist to John Sterett

 

 

 

April 22 M[ordecai] Gist to Robert Morris

 

 

 

April 25 Jos[eph] Harmar to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 21 A List of the Officers, Non-commissioned officers, and Privates Left out of the Weekly Return of the First Maryland Regiment, Sick, on Extra Service, Furlough, and Previous to the Present Arrangement of the Line

 

 

 

June 1 M[ordecai] Gist to [William] Smallwood

 

 

 

June 1 Tho[mas] S[im] Lee to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 5 M[ordecai] Gist to [William] Smallwood (enclosures missing)

 

 

 

June 5 M[ordecai] Gist to John Dickinson (enclosures missing)

 

 

 

June 7 Thomas Shubrick to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 13 Capt. [?] Roberts to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 14 John Laurens to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 17 John Rudolph to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 18 John Rudolph to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 19 A Return of the Third and Fourth Regiments and Partizan Dragoons Commanded by Brigadier General Gist

 

 

 

June 19 A Return of Wagons, Tents, and Camp Kettles, etc.

 

 

 

June 19 M[ordecai] Gist to Dr. [Frederick] Ridgely

 

 

 

June 19 Dr. F[rederick] Ridgely to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 19 Jack Rudolph to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 20 John Laurens to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 23 John Laurens to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 25 I[chabod] Burnet to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 27 A Return of Military Stores and Camp Equipment on Hand

 

 

 

June 28 M[ordecai] Gist to Lt. Col. [?] Hamilton

 

 

 

June 29 N[athanael] Pendleton to George Baylor

 

 

 

June 29 Nath[anael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 29 M[ordecai] Gist to [Nathanael Greene] (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

July 2 John Laurens to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

July 2 M[ordecai] Gist to [John] Laurens

 

 

 

July 3 I[chabod] Burnet to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

July 3 Jos[eph] Harmar to [Mordecai] Gist (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

July 4 Joseph Brown to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

July 6 Capt.[?] Crump to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

July 6 M[ordecai] Gist to [Nathanael] Greene (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

July 7 A Return of Wagons privileged with Drawing Forage in Light Troops

 

 

 

July 7 M[ordecai] Gist to [John] Rudolph

 

 

 

July 8 Will[iam] Parsons to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

July 12 I[chabod] Burnet to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

July 13 John Hamilton to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

July 14 John Wilson to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

July 22 Capt.[?] Roberts to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

July 23 George Baylor to [Mordecai] Gist

 

enclosure: A List of the Prisoners July 23, 1782

 

 

 

July 29 I[chabod] Burnet to [Mordecai] Gist (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

July 30 W[illia]m Murray to [Mordecai Gist]

 

 

 

July? John Laurens to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 3 N[athanael] Pendleton to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 4 W[illia]m Hornby to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 5 W[illia]m Eccleston to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 7 M[ordecai] Gist to [Peter] Adams

 

 

 

Aug. 9 Sir Guy Carlton to [Mordecai] Gist

 

contains copy of letter from Sir Guy Carlton and Rear Admiral Digby to George Washington Aug. 2, 1782; also copy of letter of Edward Scott Aug. 7, 1782

 

 

 

Aug. 11 R[ober]t Parker Saunders to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 11 W[illia]m Beall to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 14 M[ordecai] Gist to [George] Baylor

 

 

 

Aug. 15 Edm[un]d Rudolph to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 17 J[ohn] Swan to [Mordecai] Gist (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

Aug. 21 Capt[?] McKennan to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 21 M[ordecai] Gist to W[illia]m Beall

 

 

 

Aug. 22 J[ack] Rudolph to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 23 W[illia]m Pierce, Jr. to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 23 M[ordecai] Gist to Col. [Edward] Carrington

 

enclosure: A State of Wagons Necessary for the Baggage and Forage of the Light Troops Commanded by Gist Aug. 23, 1782

 

 

 

Aug. 25 W[illiam] Simons to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 25 M[ordecai] Gist to Capt.[?] McKinnan

 

 

 

Aug. 26 M[ordecai] Gist to Maj. [Richard] Call

 

 

 

Aug. 27 Rich[ar]d Call to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 27 M[ordecai] Gist to N[athanael] Greene

 

 

 

Aug. 28 Cha[rle]s Gerrard to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 29 Nath[anael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 30 M[ordecai] Gist to [Nathanael] Greene

 

 

 

Aug. 31 George Guthrey to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 31 William Beall to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. 31 M[ordecai] Gist to [Nathanael] Greene

 

 

 

Aug. 31 Nath[anael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Aug. Instructions for the Muster and Inspection of the Calvary

 

 

 

Sept. 1 Thomas Hutson to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Sept. 1 M[ordecai] Gist to [Thomas] Hutson

 

 

 

Sept. 2 M[ordecai] Gist to [Nathanael] Greene

 

enclosure: Charles Brown to [Mordecai] Gist Sept. 2, 1782

 

 

 

Sept. 2 A Return of the Rations Drawn from the 1st of Sept. in the Brigade of Light Troops Commanded by Brig. Gen. Gist.

 

 

 

Sept. 3 Nath[anael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Sept. 4 M[ordecai] Gist to [Nathanael] Greene

 

enclosures: A Return of the Infantry of the Light Troop Sept. 3, 1782; A Return of the Cavalry of the Light Troop Commanded by Brig. Gen. Gist Sept. 3, 1782.

 

 

 

Sept. 4 M[ordecai] Gist to [Nathanael] Greene

 

 

 

Sept. 5 John Tripp to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Sept. 5 I[chabod] Burnet to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Sept. 7 John Allen to [Mordecai Gist] (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

Sept. 9 Return of the Articles Taken in the Galley Balfour at Cuchaw River

 

 

 

Sept. 11 Jos[eph] Harmar to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Sept. 21 Jona[than] Sellman to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Sept. 23 W[illiam] Smallwood to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Sept. 26 I[chabod] Burnet to [Mordecai] Gist (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

Sept. 28 David Olyphant to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Sept. 31 A List of the Crew of the Balfour Galley

 

 

 

Oct. 2 Robert Anderson to [Mordecai] Gist (enclosures missing)

 

 

 

Oct. 9 Memorandum of Necessaries Sent to Charles Town

 

 

 

Oct. 17 N[athanael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Nov. 5 J[ohn] Swan to [Mordecai] Gist (enclosures missing)

 

 

 

Nov. 11 William Beall to Mordecai Gist

 

 

 

Nov. 15 Will[iam] Pierce, Jr. to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Nov. 15 Nath[anael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Nov. 15 Certificate of Pay Due to John Harris, Soldier in First Maryland Line

 

 

 

Nov. 16 M[ordecai] Gist to Thomas Gist

 

 

 

Nov. 18 M[ordecai] Gist to [Nathanael] Greene

 

 

 

Nov. 25 J[ohn] Swan to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Dec. 2 Benj[amin] Mathewes to?

 

 

 

Dec. 2 Thomas Hutchinson to [Mordecai] Gist (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

Dec. 6 J[ohn] Swan to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Dec. 12 Geo[rge] Turnbull to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Dec. 26 J[ohn] Swan to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

 

Roll II

1783

 

 

Jan. 1 Nath[anael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

enclosure: J[ohn] F[aucheraud] Grimké to [Nathanael] Greene Dec. 31, 1782

 

 

 

Jan. 3 Jos[eph] Harmar to [Mordecai] Gist, Report of the Guards on James Island

 

 

 

Jan. 7 Report and Disposition of the Guards

 

 

 

Jan. 7 John Steward to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 8 Jos[eph] Harmar to [Mordecai] Gist, Report of the Guards

 

 

 

Jan. 15 M[ordecai] Gist to Edward Lightwood

 

 

 

Jan. 15 General Assembly of Maryland to [Nathanael] Greene

 

 

 

Jan. 15 M[ordecai] Gist to Governor [John] Mathews

 

 

 

Jan. 16 M[ordecai] Gist to Col. [Edward] Carrington

 

 

 

Jan. 17 F. Tate to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 17 Thomas Farr to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 17 Col. Ed[ward] Carrington to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 18 M[ordecai] Gist to Major [?] Donoho

 

 

 

Jan. 19 M[ordecai] Gist to Major [?] Eggleston

 

 

 

Jan. 19 Col. Ed[ward] Carrington to [Mordecai] Gist (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

Jan. 20 M[ordecai] Gist to Capt.[?] Jenkins (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

Jan. 20 M[ordecai] Gist to Lt.[?] Warren (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

Jan. 21 Report and Disposition of the Guards

 

 

 

Jan. 21 Return of Provisions and Stores on Hand at the Magazine of the Southern Army

 

 

 

Jan. 23 M[ordecai] Gist to J[ohn] Swann

 

 

 

Jan. 23 Col. Ed[ward] Carrington to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 24 Report of the Provisions and Stores on Hand at the Magazine of the Southern Army

 

 

 

Jan. 25 Report of the Different Camp Guards

 

 

 

Jan. 26 Col. Ed[ward] Carrington to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 26 W[illia]m Mathews to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 26 J[ohn] Swan to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 26 Report of the Guards

 

 

 

Jan. 27 Report of the Guards

 

 

 

Jan. 27 Jos[eph] Eggleston to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 27 Report of the Provisions, etc. on hand at the Magazine of the Southern Army

 

 

 

Jan. 28 Report of the Different Guards

 

 

 

Jan. 28 J. Moore to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 29 N[athanael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Jan. 29 Report and Disposition of the Guards on James Island

 

 

 

Jan. 29 Report of the Provisions, etc. on hand at the Magazine of the Southern Army

 

 

 

Jan. 30 W[illia]m Paca to [Nathanael] Greene

 

enclosure: Maryland Assembly to N[athanael] Greene Jan. 15, 1783

 

 

 

Jan. 31 Report of the Different Guards

 

 

 

Jan.? Reports of Provisions on Hand and Issues Made to the Troops (envelope only)

 

 

 

Feb. 1 Report of Provisions, etc. on hand at the Magazine of the Southern Army

 

 

 

Feb. 3 report of the Different Guards on Camp James Island

 

 

 

Feb. 3 Report of Provisions, etc. on hand at the Magazine of the Southern Army

 

 

 

Feb. 6 Managers of Dancing Assembly to [Mordecai] Gist (enclosure missing)

 

 

 

Feb. 1-8 Return of the Number of Rations Issued per day in the Southern Army

 

 

 

Feb. 9 T[homas] Hooper to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 9 N[athanael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

enclosure: Peter Bocquet to [Nathanael Greene] Feb. 4, 1783

 

 

 

Feb. 10 Jos[eph] Harmar to [Mordecai] Gist, Report of the Guards on Camp James Island

 

 

 

Feb. 12 Report of the Guard on James Island

 

 

 

Feb. 12 Report and Disposition of the Guards on James Island

 

 

 

Feb. 15 Nath[anael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 17 Report of the Several Guards on James Island

 

 

 

Feb. 18 F. Tate to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 20 The Elders and Trustees of the Presbyterian Congregation of James Island to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Feb. 25 Report of Different Guards on Camp James Island

 

 

 

March 1 Report of Guards on Camp James Island

 

 

 

March 1-2 Report and Disposition of the Guards on James Island

 

 

 

March 2 N[athanael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 3 Report of the Guards on Camp James Island

 

 

 

March 3 M[ordecai] Gist to [Nathanael] Greene

 

 

 

March 4 Report of the Guards

 

 

 

March 4 John Banks to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 7 N[athanael] Greene to [Benjamin] Guerard

 

 

 

March 9 Report of the Guards

 

 

 

March 17 John Banks to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

March 18 Report of the Rear and Right Flank Guards and Report of the First Provost and Left Flank Guards

 

 

 

March 21 Return of Provisions

 

 

 

March 21 Report of the Rear Camp Guard

 

 

 

March 22 Report of the Rear Camp Guard and Report of the Front Right Flank and Provost Guards

 

 

 

March 22-23 Report and Disposition of the Guards on James Island

 

 

 

March 22 Report of the Camp Guards on James Island

 

 

 

March 24 Report of the Guards on Camp James Island

 

 

 

March 25 Report of the Guards on Camp James Island

 

 

 

March 26 Proceedings of a Board of Officers held at General Gist's Quarters

 

 

 

March 27 Reports of the Guards on James Island

 

 

 

April 1 D[avid] Hopkins to [Mordecai] Gist (enclosures missing)

 

 

 

April 2 William Read to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

April 2 John Banks to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

April 2 Report of the Front Provost and Left Flank Guards and Report of the Rear and Right Flank Guards

 

 

 

April 2 A Report of the Different Guards

 

 

 

April 5 N[athanael] Greene to [Benjamin] Guerard

 

 

 

April 5 B[enjamin] Guerard to [Nathanael] Greene

 

 

 

April 5 N[athanael] Greene to the Sheriff of Charles Town District

 

 

 

April 5 N[athanael] Greene to [Benjamin] Guerard

 

 

 

April 6 Ben[jamin] Guerard to [Nathanael] Greene

 

 

 

April 6 Benja[min] Elliott to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

April 7 N[athanael] Greene to [Benjamin] Guerard

 

enclosure: Resolves of Congress Oct 4, 1782

 

 

 

April 7 Ben[jamin] Guerard to [Nathanael] Greene (enclosures missing)

 

 

 

April 7 N[athanael] Greene to [Benjamin] Guerard

 

 

 

April 9 N[athanael] Greene to [Benjamin] Guerard

 

enclosure: Council of War in Charles Town, April 7, 1783

 

 

 

April 13 N[athanael] Greene to [Benjamin] Guerard

 

 

 

April 13 Ben[jamin] Guerard to [Nathanael] Greene

 

 

 

April 18 M[ordecai] Gist to Col. [?] Minges

 

 

 

April 18 Report of the Rear Guard; Report of the Front Provost and Left Flank; Report of the Right Flank

 

 

 

May 3 N[athanael] Greene to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 6 John Gale to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 8 Report of the Guards on Camp James Island

 

 

 

May 9 Report of the Front Left Flank and Provost Guards

 

 

 

May 9 Report of the Rear Guard and of the Right Flank

 

 

 

May 12 Report of the Guards on Camp James Island

 

 

 

May 12 Report of the Right Flank Guard

 

 

 

May 19 N[athanael] Pendleton to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 20 M[aurice] Simms to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 21 J[ohn] Trueman to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

May 29 M[ordecai] Gist to John Banks

 

 

 

May? Review of the Army on Camp James Island

 

 

 

May? Maj. [?] Edwards to [Mordecai Gist]

 

 

 

June 11 F. Tate to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 12 James Logie to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

June 13 A Report of the Guards on Camp James Island

 

 

 

June 13 Report of Front, Provost, Left, and Right Flank Guards

 

 

 

June 24 M[ordecai] Gist to W[illia]m Fitzhugh

 

 

 

July 8 Return of the Troops to Embark for the North

 

 

 

July 21 Robert Forsyth and Company to [Mordecai] Gist

 

enclosure: Robert Forsyth and Company to Stephen Steward July 21, 1783

 

 

 

July 25 M[ordecai] Gist to [William] Smallwood

 

 

 

Oct. 10 J[ohn] Swan to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Oct. 26 Col. [?] White to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Dec. 15 [Mordecai Gist] to [George] Washington

 

 

 

? John Eccleston to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

? Abstract of a letter from the Secretary of War to [Nathanael] Greene

 

 

 

? John Gales' Account Against the United States

 

 

 

? [Nathanael Greene] to [Benjamin Guerard]

 

 

 

? Contract between John Banks and Robert Morris

 

 

 

 

1784

 

 

July 4-7 Proceedings of the Society of the Cincinnati of the State of Maryland

 

 

 

Sept. 8 John Hamilton to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Oct. 20 John White to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Nov. 17 John Gale to [Mordecai Gist]

 

 

 

Dec. 9 Christopher Richmond to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

Dec. 24 The Report of the Intendant of the Revenue to the General Assembly of Maryland (printed)

 

 

 

 

1785

 

 

Jan. 29 [John] Hamilton to [Mordecai] Gist (enclosures)

 

 

 

 

1786

 

 

Aug. 3 Certification by M[ordecai] Gist that James Sappington was a soldier in the Fifth Maryland Regiment

 

 

 

Oct. 10 Order by C[hristopher] Richmond that James Sappington has been paid

 

 

 

 

1790

 

 

Oct. 16 M[ordecai] Gist to T. B. Bowen

 

 

 

 

1792

 

 

April 15 M[ordecai] Gist to [Henry] Knox

 

 

 

July 5 Petition of Ancient York Masons to M[ordecai] Gist

 

 

 

 

Orderly and Account Books

 

 

1779 May 20-August 20 Orderly Book

 

 

 

1780 March 5-July 14 Orderly Book

 

 

 

1780 July 26-August 15 Orderly Book

 

 

 

1780 Aug. 3-July 20, 1781 Returns, Accounts, and Memoranda of General Gist

 

 

 

1781 Oct 16-April 4, 1782 Orderly Book

 

 

 

1781 December 5-April 4, 1782 Orderly Book

 

 

 

1782 April 5-August 4 Orderly Book

 

 

 

1780 July 22-Nov. 11, 1783 Accounts of General Gist

 

 

 

 

Undated Documents (Filmed in this order)

 

 

A List of the men belonging to the 3d, 4th and 5th Regiments who join'd the 28th Instant under the Command of Captain William D. Beall.

 

 

 

List of Officers in Colonel Mordecai Gist's Regiment.

 

 

 

Acct of Men in So Carolina Formerly of the Maryland Line.

 

 

 

Return of Wagons Horses Tents Camp Equipage etc. in the Maryland Brigade Commanded by Brigadier Genl. Gist.

 

 

 

Pay List for the Southern Department and Rations.

 

 

 

A Clothing Return for Detachment of Maryd. Troops at the Garrison of Whitstone Point.

 

 

 

An Estimate of Clothing, Arms and Accoutrements Necessary to be immediately procured for the Recruits to be raised in the State of Maryland.

 

 

 

State of Maryland in acc. with Mordecai Gist.

 

 

 

The United States In Account Current with M. Gist.

 

 

 

The United States In Account Current with M. Gist.

 

 

 

Report of the Front and Provost Guard May 12th.

 

 

 

Proceedings of a Brigade Court Martial

 

 

 

Proceedings of a Brigade Court Martial

 

 

 

Proceedings of a Brigade Court Martial

 

 

 

Particulars of the truce agreed upon between Colonel Barnwell and Major Brereton for the Island of Port Royal.

 

 

 

Sir Henry Clintons Soliloquy recovering from the Phrenzy into which he was thrown by Storming Stony point.

 

 

 

Committee appointed to form Regulations for the Procession on next St. John's Day (Masonic document)

 

 

 

The Committee to whom was referred the letter from General Gist respecting the Officers and Soldiers of the Maryland Line.

 

 

 

Memorial to the Legislature of Maryland by the Officers of the Maryland Line

 

 

 

Legislature of Maryland to General Gist

 

 

 

Mrs. John Hard to General Gist

 

 

 

J[ohn] Swan to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

N[athanael] Pendleton to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

J[ohn] Rudolph to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

J[ohn] Rudolph to [Mordecai] Gist

 

 

 

William Smallwood to Mordecai Gist (fragment only)

 

 

 

Unidentified Map of Land Grant

 

 

 

Marching Instructions.

 

 

 

 

 

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The user is further cautioned that unauthorized publication of manuscripts may be construed as a violation of literary property rights. These rights derive from the common-law principle that the author of an unpublished letter or other manuscript, or his executors, heirs, or legatees, has the sole right to publish the contents thereof; unless he or another authorized person affirmatively parts with that right, it subsists regardless of the ownership of the physical manuscript. It is the responsibility of the would-be user or his publisher to secure from the owner of the literary rights permission to publish.

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AVAILABILITY OF MICROFILM

The microfilm edition of the Gist Papers may be used at the Maryland Historical Society or purchased at $20 a roll, $40 for the complete film of 2 rolls. A copy of the pamphlet Guide is available at $2.50. Please address all inquiries and orders to the Curator of Manuscripts, Maryland Historical Society, 201 West Monument Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21202.

Other Maryland Historical Society Microfilm Publications:

Calvert Papers, 27 rolls.

Robert Goodloe Harper Family Papers, 5 rolls.

John Pendleton Kennedy Papers, 27 rolls.

Lloyd Papers, 41 rolls.

David Bailie Warden Papers, 8 rolls.

William Wirt Papers, 24 rolls.

 

 

 

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