Evelyn B. Randall Hanrahan Papers, MS 3018

 

Special Collections Department of the H. Furlong Baldwin Library of the Maryland Historical Society

 

Evelyn B. Randall Hanrahan Papers

1896 – 1975 

MS 3018

 

Evelyn B. Randall Hanrahan, 1896-1978

 

Special Collections Department

H. Furlong Baldwin Library

Maryland Historical Society

201 West Monument Street

Baltimore, MD 21201

Tel:  410-685-3750

Fax:  410-385-2105

E-Mail:  specialcollections@mdhs.org

Internet:  www.mdhs.org

 

Processed by Jaime M. Jackson

May 2004

 

Evelyn B. Randall Hanrahan Papers, 1896 – 1975

MS 3018

 

Provenance:

The Evelyn B. Randall Hanrahan Papers were given to the H. Furlong Baldwin Library of the Maryland Historical Society in 1999 by Mrs. Susan Brune Randall Greenlee White, granddaughter of Evelyn B. Randall Hanrahan, and her husband Frank Ellison White, Jr.

Size:                          

3.5 linear feet (7 boxes)

Access:                    

Access to this collection is unrestricted.

Copyright:                  

The Evelyn B. Randall Hanrahan Papers are the physical property of the H. Furlong Baldwin Library of the Maryland Historical Society.  Copyright belongs to the authors or creators of the works or their legal representatives.  For further information, consult the Special Collections Librarian.

Permission:                 

Permission to publish material from the collection must be requested in writing from the Special Collections Librarian, Maryland Historical Society.

Preferred Citation:     

Evelyn B. Randall Hanrahan Papers, 1896-1975, MS 3018

H. Furlong Baldwin Library, Maryland Historical Society

 

Biographical Sketch

Evelyn Barton Randall was born in 1890 to prominent Baltimoreans Blanchard Randall and his wife Susan Katherine Brune.   Evelyn attended St. Timothy’s School then Bryn Mawr College from 1913-1914.  She trained in social work at Johns Hopkins Hospital during World War I, before engaging in an active career in social work and reform.    In 1923 she married Edward Hanrahan, a physician at Johns Hopkins University Hospital.  From 1950 to 1952 Edward Hanrahan underwent treatment for tuberculosis and succumbed on October 2, 1952.  Mrs. Evelyn B. Randall Hanrahan died July 4, 1978.

Chronology – Social Work and Career

1919                      Earned certification as a psychiatric social worker

1929                                      Family Welfare Association caseworker

1932                      Investigator for Maryland Welfare Board and Federal Government

1933-1942             Maryland League for Crippled Children

                              Salvation Army

                              Bureau of Homeless and Transient Men

                              Executive Director, Junior League’s Volunteer Placement Bureau

1942                                      Helped organize Mid-Atlantic Office of Civilian Defense

      Red Cross Case Worker Volunteer

1945                                      Founded domestic and medical employment service agency

1972                      Retired, Real Estate Agent DeBuys, Wilson, Piper Co.


Other Affiliations

Girl Scout Council

Secretary, Maryland Conference of Social Welfare

Parole Board

Criminal Justice Commission

Mount Vernon Club

Helped establish first Birth Control Clinic, forerunner of Planned Parenthood

Scope and Content Note

The papers of Evelyn B. Randall Hanrahan range from 1898 – 1975.  The bulk of materials consist primarily of correspondence received by Evelyn B. Randall during World War I, mainly from 1917 to 1919.  Letters were received from family, friends, acquaintances or suitors including C. E. Ellicott, Jr. (Ellis), Lt. Robert Gustafson, John L. Dorsey, Lt. C. A. Waters (Buck), Donald Thompson, a friend of the family “Jack” at Princeton, Edward Hanrahan, and others. During the winter of 1917-1918 Evelyn, her mother Susan and sister Elizabeth stayed in Anniston, Alabama to be near their brother, Alexander, who was serving in the Army and stationed there.  Letters sent to Evelyn in Anniston are included.  Many letters discuss personal and family business, observations about the war, life in Europe and military camps, and personal emotions.  A smaller amount of correspondence from 1919 through 1975 follows and includes letters from family and friends, usually discussing travel, vacations, and family business.

Papers related to Edward Hanrahan and his treatment and ultimate death from tuberculosis in 1952 with a large amount of corresponding sympathy letters and cards follow. Also included are sympathy letters related to the deaths of other family members, early family correspondence from Blanchard Randall to his wife Susan and children (including Evelyn), letters relating to Julie Hanrahan Greenlee, and letters between other family members, including Emily Randall, Frederick Randall, and Elizabeth (Bessie) Randall (Mrs. Harry R. Slack).  Two postcard and photo albums (probably originally belonging to Elizabeth Randall) conclude the collection. 

The Randall family social position, coupled with their generous activities in social work and philanthropy, allowed the family the ability to travel and to make many social contacts.  Although papers related to Evelyn’s official business and social work activities are not found here, the collection provides a glimpse of the life of upper-class women in early twentieth century social work.  The correspondence contained in this collection reflects the extent to which Evelyn and her husband were a part of Baltimore society and the Johns Hopkins medical community.  The correspondence and materials related to Edward Hanrahan’s death, which greatly affecting Evelyn as evidenced by the amount of correspondence she retained, reveal much about there relationship and personalities.  Letters between family members and friends demonstrate a close knit, loving and active family.

Additional materials and correspondence can be found in the following collections:

Brune-Randall Family Papers, MS 2004

Philpot-Randall Family Papers, MS 2816

Randall-Brune-Philpot Family Papers, MS 2824

 

Series I: Randall Family Correspondence, 1898 – 1965 (Box 1, 10 Folders )

This series includes correspondence between members of the Randall and Hanrahan families of multiple generations.  Topics include travel, world events, and family topics.

 

            Subseries I: Katherine Randall Letters, 1898-1901

            This subseries contains letters sent to and written by Katherine Randall.

            Subseries II: Blanchard Randall Letters, 1898-1917

            This subseries contains letters written by Blanchard Randall to various members of his family.

            Subseries III: Susan Randall Letters, 1912-1921

            This subseries consists of letters sent to Susan Brune Randall by various family and friends.

            Subseries IV: Julie Hanrahan Greenlee (Mrs. Robert E. Greenlee, Jr.) Letters, 1937-1970

            This subseries contains letters sent to Julie Hanrahan Greenlee, mostly from Emily Randall,           and letters written by Julie Hanrahan Greenlee to other family members.

Series II: Correspondence, 1914-1922 (World War I Correspondence) (Box 1-3, 29 Folders)

This series includes letters received by Evelyn B. Randall from various friends, associates, and suitors serving in various locations across the United States and Europe during World War I.  Topics include traveling through Europe, troop movements, daily life at army camps, general observations about the war, family business, and personal feelings. 

Series III: Correspondence, 1935-1975 (Box 4-6)

General correspondence from friends and associates received by Evelyn B. Randall and Edward Hanrahan. Topics include family business, courtesy and thank you letters, invitations, travel, and personal feelings. 

Series III: Edward Hanrahan Papers, 1937-1952 (Box 6)

This series includes correspondence to Edward Hanrahan, documents related to Edward Hanrahan’s treatment for tuberculosis, including physician’s letters, a Pneumoperifoneum Record journal, and other business related correspondence. A large portion consists of sympathy letters, donations made in his name, acknowledgments and cards, as well as lists, presumably made by Evelyn, of flowers and phone calls received following his passing. Negatives of leprosy, undated, are also included here.

Series IV: Postcards and Photographs (Box 7, 2 Volumes)

Scrapbook I contains photographs ca. 1911-1912 from the Philippines, Japan, and Europe.  Most images include views of building exteriors, interiors, streetscapes, and local people.  The photographs were most likely taken during Elizabeth Randall’s travels to Manila in 1911.  Most images are unidentified; some have identification written in pencil on the dark backing paper identifying family members.  Scrapbook II contains a large collection of postcards, mostly from Germany and Europe.  Some cards of German royalty and silhouettes of famous literate are included.

Container List

Box/Folder

Series I: Randall Family Correspondence, 1898-1965 (Box 1, Folder 1-8)

Box 1 

1-1                                       Letters to Various Family Members from Evelyn B. Randall, 1909-1919, ca. 1900 (18 letters).

1-2                                       Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, 1907-1913 (7 letters)

1-3                          Letters between various family members 1906-1917 (6 letters), undated (3 letters)

Subseries I: Katherine Randall Letters, 1898-1901

1-4                                  Letters to “Grandma” Mrs. F. W. Brune from Katherine Randall, 1898 (2 letters).

1-5                                  Letters to Katherine Randall, 1900-1901, ca. 1900 (6 letters).

                                Subseries II: Blanchard Randall Letters, 1898-1917

1-6                                  Letters from Blanchard Randall to family (Susan Randall), 1898, 1917, ca. 1917 (10 letters)

                                Subseries III: Susan Randall Letters, 1912-1921

1-7                                  Letters to Mrs. Susan Randall from Various, 1912-1921, ca. 1918 (7 letters)

                               Subseries IV: Julie Hanrahan Greenlee (Mrs. Robert E. Greenlee, Jr.) Letters, 1937-1970

1-8                                  Letters from Julie Hanrahan to various family members, 1937-1970

1-9                                  Letters to Julie Hanrahan, mostly from Emily Randall, 1942-1954.

1-10                                Letters to Julie Hanrahan, mostly from Emily Randall, 1955-1965.

Series II: Correspondence, 1914-1922 (World War I Correspondence) (Box 1-3)

1-11                        Miscellaneous Papers – American Red Cross Surgical Supplies Preparation Certificate, 20 April 1917;                           Check dated 15 Sept 1917; Photo – Dr. B. Lucien Brun, Dr. C.A. Waters, Dr. W. A. Fisher, ca. 1917;                              Newsclipping “Johns Hopkins Hospital Unit Off to War” photo with caption, ca. 1917.

1-12                        Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, 1914

 Box 2

 

2-1                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, 1915

2-2                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, 1916

2-3                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, January 1917

2-4                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, February – March 1917

2-5                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, April – May 1917

2-6                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, June – July 1917

2-7                                 Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, August – October 1917

2-8                                      Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, November 1917

2-9                                      Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, December 1917

2-10                                    Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, ca. 1917-1918

2-11                                    Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, January 1918

2-12                                    Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, February 1918

2-13                                    Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, March 1918

2-14                                    Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, April 1918

2-15                                    Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, May 1918

Box 3 

3-1                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, June – July 1918

3-2                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, August 1918

3-3                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, September 1918

3-4                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, October 1918

3-5                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, November 1918

3-6                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, December 1918

3-7                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, January 1919

3-8                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, February 1919

3-9                                       Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, March 1919

3-10                                    Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, April – May 1919

3-11                                    Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, June – July 1919

3-12                            Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, October 1919 – July 1922

Series III: Correspondence, 1935-1975

Box 4 

4-1                                       Correspondence, 1935-1938

4-2                                       Correspondence, 1939-1943

4-3                                       Correspondence, 1944-1948

4-4                                       Correspondence, 1949

4-5                                       Correspondence, 1950-1951

4-6                                       Correspondence, 1952-1954

4-7                                       Correspondence, 1955

4-8                                       Correspondence, 1956-1959

4-9                                       Correspondence, 1960-1969

4-10                                    Correspondence, 1970-1975

4-11                                    Undated Correspondence

4-12                                    Miscellaneous Papers - sheets of personality traits listings/index, not dated; 4 folded pages listing names and some addresses, not dated; 30 April 1967 Cruise information sheet

Series IV: Edward Hanrahan Papers, 1937-1952

Box 5 

5-1                                       Sympathy Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, October 1952

5-2                                       Sympathy Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, October 1952

5-3                                       Sympathy Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, October 1952

5-4                                       Sympathy Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, October 1952

5-5                                       Sympathy Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, October 1952

5-6                                       Sympathy Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, October 1952

Box 6 

6-1                                       Sympathy Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, October 1952

6-2                                       Sympathy Correspondence, Letters to Evelyn B. Randall, November 1952

6-3                                       Sympathy cards and flower cards, October 1952

6-4                                       Sympathy cards and flower cards, October 1952

6-5                                       List of People Who Called, etc.

6-6                                       Papers related to Tuberculosis Treatment, Pneumoperifoneum Record (18 March – 13 October 1952)

6-7                                       Correspondence, 1937-1952, Johns Hopkins University Class of 1919 Roll Call for 1951.

6-8                                       Leprosy Negatives

Series V: Postcards and Photographs (Box 7)

Box 7

Scrapbook 1         European Postcards

Scrapbook 2         Photographs and Postcards

 

Transcription

Letter from the Evelyn B. Randall Hanrahan Papers

(Box 4)

M. Vieta

Am Red Cross

Langley Field

VA

 

Mrs. E. S. Hanrahan

Ruxton

Maryland

 

Nov 16, 1945

Dear Mrs. Hanrahan –

    My intensions seem to be

much better than my actions as

I have been planning to write you

for weeks & haven’t gotten around to

it until now.

    I remember a conversation we had

about how the enlisted man was so

often looked down upon by civilians and

anyone else who thought they were

elevated high enough to look down.  I

only wish they could be in my position

for even a few days & they would

soon be singing a very different tune.

My own estimation of the G.I. en-

masse & individually has gone up

a good 300% already.

    We have been working in a service

club in the section of the post that

is restricted to O.R.D overseas replacement

 

boys & then those who are getting out

in a few months because they have

had their 2 years service.  Also

there are quite a few who have

re-enlisted for another year.  Of course

the quality [sews] from one [edteme]

to the other – an amazing number at the

top end too.  There are no class

barriers in the G.I. army & you see some

very interesting combinations of “buddies.”

    There is one boy from the bronx

who is only 19 & of greek descent –

in civilian life you would be apt

to think of him as just another

tough kid from the bronx – and yet that

boy has the most amazing fund of

knowledge of the classics, music,

medicine, etc & is sincere in what he

says & means.

    There are lots who are planning

to go to college & to finish college

when they get out.  When-ever we of

the red cross get in a jam why

it’s the enlisted men that help us out

every time.  They are so appreciative

of everything we do for them

 

and will often tell us things they

won’t talk to a civilian about

because they consider us one of

them.  We’re in the same boat they

are – “Sweating out clearance.”

therefore we can understand how

they feel and why.  I’m really amazed

at the lack of gripping and

pessimism there is.

    Just let anyone try to tell

me that the G.I. is inferior and

can’t and won’t appreciate the

finer things of life, & you will

see the fur fly!

    So far I feel that I really

did make the correct decision in

joining the red cross – I’ve learned

more in 4 weeks here then I would

have in years at any other job.

 

    I hope I get a chance to

see you before I clear and

as things look now I think I

will be able to.  We expect to return

to Washington the Sunday after Thanksgiving

and maybe we’ll stay another week

before we go.  I hope so –

    Give my best to Dr. Hanrahan

    Love

           Majer.

 

Games