Benjamin Chew Howard Manuscript Collection, 1824-1861, MS 3159

Finding Aid to the Benjamin Chew Howard Manuscript Collection, 1824-1861, MS 3159

H. Furlong Baldwin Library, Maryland Historical Society

 

Collection summary

Title

Benjamin Chew Howard Manuscript Collection

Creator

Howard, Benjamin Chew

Call number

MS 3159

Inclusive dates

1824-1861

Bulk dates

1850

Extent

1 box, 4 folders

Abstract

Consists of correspondence from Benjamin Chew Howard to his wife, Jane Gilmor Howard

Administrative summary

Repository

H. Furlong Baldwin Library

Maryland Historical Society

201 W. Monument St.

Baltimore, MD 21201

www.mdhs.org

specialcollections@mdhs.org

Access restrictions

Open to the public without restrictions.

Use restrictions

Permission to quote must be received in writing from the Special Collections Librarian.

Provenance

Unknown

Accession number

Unknown

Processing note

Processed by Lara Westwood, August, 2014

 

Biographical Note

Benjamin Chew Howard, 1791-1872, was a lawyer and statesman from Baltimore County, Maryland. He was born at his family’s home, Belvedere, to John Eager Howard and Peggy Oswald Chew. His father fought in the Revolutionary War and served Maryland as governor and senator. Howard attended primary school in Baltimore before pursuing studies at Princeton University, which was then called the College of New Jersey. He returned to Baltimore to study the law, but his work was interrupted by the War of 1812. Howard became deeply involved in the war effort. He helped organize troops for the defense of Baltimore and commanded the First Mechanical Volunteers at the Battle of North Point. After the war, he returned to his legal studies, gained admittance to the bar in 1816, and set up a prosperous legal practice. He married Jane Gilmor, 1801-1890, in 1818.

He launched a successful political career soon thereafter. He served in Baltimore city government and won four terms in Congress for the state of Maryland. He acted as a representative for peace on two occasions at the direction of the president. Under President Andrew Jackson, he worked to prevent conflict between Ohio and Michigan over disputed border territory. He also attended the Peace Conference of 1861, which attempted to stop the Southern states from ceding the Union. That year, Howard also ran for Governor of Maryland, but lost to Augustus W. Bradford. He died in Baltimore in 1872 after a long illness.

Related Collections:

Benjamin Chew Howard Papers, 1696-1935, MS 2619

Benjamin Chew Howard Papers, 1843-1857, MS 1230

John Eager Howard Papers, 1662-1919, MS 469

 

Scope and Content

The collection primarily consists of correspondence from Benjamin Chew Howard to his wife, Jane Gilmor Howard. He recounts his work on legal cases and matters in Congress to his wife almost on a daily basis. The letters give detailed accounts of Howard’s daily life. For example, his letters from 1850 go into great detail about his journey to New Orleans from Baltimore down the Mississippi River, including scenes along the river and people he meets on board the steamboat. He also described his work for President Andrew Jackson in preventing a border war between Michigan and Ohio over the The correspondence also frequently alludes to growing tensions between Northern and Southern states over slavery and states’ rights. In a letter written during the Peace Conference of 1861, he expresses fear that a civil war is inevitable. Howard never shies from sharing his opinion and experiences with his wife.

 

Container List 

Contents 

Dates 

Box 

Folder

Correspondence

1824-1835

1

1

Correspondence

1837-1842

1

2

Correspondence

1850

1

3

Correspondence

1861

1

4

 

 

 

 

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