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Baltimore neighborhoods

This tag is associated with 14 posts

Growing Up in Fell’s Point: More Jennie Sokolowska Stories

The previous installment of this series appeared on December 15, 2016. Jane Schoeberlein (1924-2014), known as Jennie Sokolowska in her youth, was the daughter of Polish immigrants of limited means. She spent her childhood and early adult life in the Fell’s Point area of East Baltimore. Here are a few of her stories that touch [...]

French Delegation to Baltimore, May 1917: A Botanical Memento

One hundred years ago today these pansies bloomed in a lush and colorful bed on the east side of Mount Vernon Place. Three days later, on May 14, 1917, thousands of Baltimoreans gathered as city officials escorted a French war delegation to the proposed site of a monument to the Marquis de Lafayette, American ally [...]

Growing Up in Fell’s Point: Jennie Sokolowska’s Stories

My mother Jane Schoeberlein, known in her youth as Jennie Sokolowska, passed away in December 2014. As a means of memorializing her, and also to hold on to her spirit for just a little bit longer, I wrote down some stories and memories that she had shared with me about her youth. Here is a [...]

A Fight for Recognition: The Lumbee Tribe in Maryland

The 2010 United States Census listed 566 American Indian tribes in the United States, none of which reside in the State of Maryland, despite the fact that our state has 20,420 Native American residents, 2,270 of whom live in Baltimore alone, according to the Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities. Why this dichotomy? Especially [...]

Port Covington: Baltimore’s Junction with the World

Port Covington long served South Baltimore as an industrial hub of the city. Sharing a peninsula with Locust Point and Fort McHenry, the port was for many years the Western Maryland Railway’s “junction with the world.” It is most remembered as a bustling port, filled with ships and trains ready to send freight across the [...]

Lost City: Baltimore’s Grand Theatres

What happened to the movie business in Baltimore? Between 1900 and 1970 about 235 movie theatres in Baltimore opened and closed. The technological advances that created this once popular form of entertainment also contributed to its demise, as television and later the internet allowed viewers to stay at home to watch a wide variety of program [...]

Lost City: Local Taverns and Big Breweries

Back in the days when Baltimore was a manufacturing center, neighborhood bars were gathering places for the blue collar workers that worked in the industries. Their thirsts were quenched by the local breweries that produced beer for working men and women and even some high quality brews. Many of these neighborhood taverns were destroyed in [...]

E.J. Gallagher: Builder of Lifetime Homes

In the first decades of the twentieth century Baltimore saw a boom in rowhouse building that came to be dominated by just a handful of builders. One of these developers was Edward Joseph Gallagher, the son of Irish immigrants, whose most successful and well-known creation, Ednor Gardens, became a model for developments throughout Baltimore.(1) While [...]

Lizette Woodworth Reese and the Poetry of Spring

Lizette Woodworth Reese was one of the most beloved poets to live and write in Baltimore. Her crisp but lyrical poems captured the beauty of the city and her beloved Waverly neighborhood. Her work was deep and insightful but never overwrought or overly sentimental. It frequently drew comparison to the simple but elegant work of [...]

“The World’s Largest Outdoor Insane Asylum:” Memorial Stadium, Part I

(This is the first part of a two part series. The second part will be posted in January, 2015.) Baltimore has been lucky enough to host two storied professional football teams: the-team-that-must-not-be-named, ahem, the Colts and the two-time Super Bowl Champions Baltimore Ravens. Not to mention the fantastic local college and high school teams. Marylanders [...]

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