// archives

Baltimore History

This tag is associated with 65 posts

French Delegation to Baltimore, May 1917: A Botanical Memento

One hundred years ago today these pansies bloomed in a lush and colorful bed on the east side of Mount Vernon Place. Three days later, on May 14, 1917, thousands of Baltimoreans gathered as city officials escorted a French war delegation to the proposed site of a monument to the Marquis de Lafayette, American ally [...]

The Newcomer Memorial Font: Art and Industry in Baltimore City

Baltimore’s long history as “The Monumental City” and current art culture means that there is an abundance of outdoor sculpture available to see. Although these public sculptures make the city’s streets rich with decoration, artwork that is placed indoors is sometimes overlooked. One such sculpture is the Newcomer Memorial Font (1902-1904) inside the Emmanuel Episcopal [...]

The Maryland Military Homefront during World War I

This piece originally appeared in the Maryland Historical Magazine, Volume 111, No.1 (Spring/Summer 2016) As cultural institutions around the world commemorate the centennial of the Great War, the Maryland Historical Society prepares for a new museum exhibit on the arrival of the Deustchland, (Currently on display at MdHS) a German merchant submarine that visited Baltimore [...]

Lost City: Baltimore’s Trolleys, Trackless Trolleys and Buses

There was a time when you could take a trolley from Liberty Heights Avenue or Roland Avenue down to Stewart’s Department Store on Howard Street or one of the downtown movie theatres on Lexington Avenue. This was the way some children got to school and in a time when not many people could afford a [...]

Taking a Stand in History! National History Day Research at MdHS

Within my role in the education department at MdHS, I have the pleasure of interacting with middle and high school students who have gone the extra mile for their National History Day projects. Founded in 1974, the NHD program is the social studies equivalent of a science fair, allowing young people to apply their creativity [...]

The Baltimore Chronicle: Baltimore’s Community Newspaper

In the late 1960s—late 1970s, a number of alternative and underground newspapers sprang up in Baltimore. These papers intended to fill a news void with coverage of subject matter—the counterculture, radical politics, local artists and musicians, avant-garde theatre, community news—largely ignored by mainstream publications, notably the Baltimore Sun and the Baltimore News-American. The publications ranged from cultural and literary magazines [...]

Growing Up in Fell’s Point: Jennie Sokolowska’s Stories

My mother Jane Schoeberlein, known in her youth as Jennie Sokolowska, passed away in December 2014. As a means of memorializing her, and also to hold on to her spirit for just a little bit longer, I wrote down some stories and memories that she had shared with me about her youth. Here is a [...]

The Negro Baseball Leagues and the Baltimore Elite Giants

Baseball is not a new game. Baseball players battled each other as early as the middle of the 19th century, although the game was quite different from today’s.  As early as the 1860s, men played baseball on an open lot on Baltimore’s Madison Avenue near Druid Hill Park. Catchers had no protective gear; a ball [...]

A Fight for Recognition: The Lumbee Tribe in Maryland

The 2010 United States Census listed 566 American Indian tribes in the United States, none of which reside in the State of Maryland, despite the fact that our state has 20,420 Native American residents, 2,270 of whom live in Baltimore alone, according to the Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities. Why this dichotomy? Especially [...]

Baltimore Neighborhoods, Inc.: Maryland’s Fair Housing Pioneer

Baltimore was a deeply troubled city after World War II. Greedy real estate agents created fear and panic among white homeowners by persuading them that their houses were about to lose their value, and that they would be ruined financially.  White families evacuated their urban neighborhoods, to be replaced by black residents. Blockbusting and racial [...]

Facebook

Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On YoutubeVisit Us On Pinterest