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The Newcomer Memorial Font: Art and Industry in Baltimore City

Baltimore’s long history as “The Monumental City” and current art culture means that there is an abundance of outdoor sculpture available to see. Although these public sculptures make the city’s streets rich with decoration, artwork that is placed indoors is sometimes overlooked. One such sculpture is the Newcomer Memorial Font (1902-1904) inside the Emmanuel Episcopal [...]

The Maryland Military Homefront during World War I

This piece originally appeared in the Maryland Historical Magazine, Volume 111, No.1 (Spring/Summer 2016) As cultural institutions around the world commemorate the centennial of the Great War, the Maryland Historical Society prepares for a new museum exhibit on the arrival of the Deustchland, (Currently on display at MdHS) a German merchant submarine that visited Baltimore [...]

Taking a Stand in History! National History Day Research at MdHS

Within my role in the education department at MdHS, I have the pleasure of interacting with middle and high school students who have gone the extra mile for their National History Day projects. Founded in 1974, the NHD program is the social studies equivalent of a science fair, allowing young people to apply their creativity [...]

The Baltimore Chronicle: Baltimore’s Community Newspaper

In the late 1960s—late 1970s, a number of alternative and underground newspapers sprang up in Baltimore. These papers intended to fill a news void with coverage of subject matter—the counterculture, radical politics, local artists and musicians, avant-garde theatre, community news—largely ignored by mainstream publications, notably the Baltimore Sun and the Baltimore News-American. The publications ranged from cultural and literary magazines [...]

“It’s Groundhog Day!”

Groundhog Day is a much celebrated American holiday, but its roots stem from older traditions in Europe when people were more in tune with Mother Nature, seasonal changes, and animal behavior. Today, many Americans are aware of the summer solstice and winter equinox, but before the Roman calendar existed, the year was divided into four [...]

English Empire, Catholic Marketing: Promoting Investment and Settlement in Seventeenth Century Maryland

“… I had procured a red bird and kept it a good while to have sent it to you but I had the ill fortune to loose it by the negligence of my servant who carelesly let it out of the cage… The Lyon I had for you is dead, if I can get an [...]

Traveling through History: Stories of the Northern Central Railroad during the Civil War

The Northern Central Railroad Trail (NCR) in the GunpowderFallsState Park is a popular destination in northern Baltimore County for those who enjoy the great outdoors. Walkers, runners, and horseback riders enjoy the trail year-round; kayakers and tubers paddle and splash through the river in the warmer months; anglers and fly fishermen bask in the GunpowderRiver [...]

Mariano Cubí y Soler: The legacy of a pioneer Spanish linguist in Maryland

Earlier this year I started researching into the life and works of Professor Mariano Cubí y Soler as a Lord Baltimore Fellow at the Maryland Historical Society. During this time, I have learned a great deal about professor Cubí y Soler, an innovative and distinguished scholar in the nineteenth century in the United States, Latin [...]

Staff Favorites: “President Lincoln’s head rested on this wall paper . . . April 14, 1865”

So wrote Henry Furgeson, beneath the scrap of burgundy and rose pattern wallpaper found in the Mary Ann Booth collection (MS 2125) during the research for the MdHS Civil War exhibit in 2011. This decorative paper lined the walls of Lincoln’s box at Ford’s Theatre the night John Wilkes Booth assassinated the sixteenth president of [...]

Staff Favorites: Thomas Boyle’s Proclamation

The following tale is based on historic fact with a dose of urban legend…. On a dark and stormy night (no, not really) in July 1814, Captain Boyle, a highly successful privateer and commander of the Baltimore-built ship Chasseur, set sail on a cruise across the Atlantic to “take prizes” –  to attack enemy merchant [...]

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