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Baltimore Neighborhoods

This category contains 32 posts

French Delegation to Baltimore, May 1917: A Botanical Memento

One hundred years ago today these pansies bloomed in a lush and colorful bed on the east side of Mount Vernon Place. Three days later, on May 14, 1917, thousands of Baltimoreans gathered as city officials escorted a French war delegation to the proposed site of a monument to the Marquis de Lafayette, American ally [...]

The Newcomer Memorial Font: Art and Industry in Baltimore City

Baltimore’s long history as “The Monumental City” and current art culture means that there is an abundance of outdoor sculpture available to see. Although these public sculptures make the city’s streets rich with decoration, artwork that is placed indoors is sometimes overlooked. One such sculpture is the Newcomer Memorial Font (1902-1904) inside the Emmanuel Episcopal [...]

Lost City: Baltimore’s Trolleys, Trackless Trolleys and Buses

There was a time when you could take a trolley from Liberty Heights Avenue or Roland Avenue down to Stewart’s Department Store on Howard Street or one of the downtown movie theatres on Lexington Avenue. This was the way some children got to school and in a time when not many people could afford a [...]

Growing Up in Fell’s Point: Jennie Sokolowska’s Stories

My mother Jane Schoeberlein, known in her youth as Jennie Sokolowska, passed away in December 2014. As a means of memorializing her, and also to hold on to her spirit for just a little bit longer, I wrote down some stories and memories that she had shared with me about her youth. Here is a [...]

Staff Favorites: “Behind the Scene’s At Hutzler’s”

As we’ve previously pointed out, choosing a favorite thing among millions of archival materials stored at MdHS is a practically absurd task. While this writer skews toward more modern fare, say for example photography by local heroes Paul Henderson, Robert Kniesche, or Joseph Kohl, it’s still a Sophie’s choice. Finding my arm twisted vigorously by [...]

A Fight for Recognition: The Lumbee Tribe in Maryland

The 2010 United States Census listed 566 American Indian tribes in the United States, none of which reside in the State of Maryland, despite the fact that our state has 20,420 Native American residents, 2,270 of whom live in Baltimore alone, according to the Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities. Why this dichotomy? Especially [...]

Visions of Baltimore Pride, 2000

This week, the GLBT Community Center of Baltimore and Central Maryland is celebrating the 41st year of Pride events in the city. What began as a modest rally at the Charles Center plaza in 1975 has grown over the years into block parties, a massive parade in Mount Vernon, a festival in Druid Hill Park, [...]

Baltimore Neighborhoods, Inc.: Maryland’s Fair Housing Pioneer

Baltimore was a deeply troubled city after World War II. Greedy real estate agents created fear and panic among white homeowners by persuading them that their houses were about to lose their value, and that they would be ruined financially.  White families evacuated their urban neighborhoods, to be replaced by black residents. Blockbusting and racial [...]

Port Covington: Baltimore’s Junction with the World

Port Covington long served South Baltimore as an industrial hub of the city. Sharing a peninsula with Locust Point and Fort McHenry, the port was for many years the Western Maryland Railway’s “junction with the world.” It is most remembered as a bustling port, filled with ships and trains ready to send freight across the [...]

Lost City: Baltimore’s Grand Theatres

What happened to the movie business in Baltimore? Between 1900 and 1970 about 235 movie theatres in Baltimore opened and closed. The technological advances that created this once popular form of entertainment also contributed to its demise, as television and later the internet allowed viewers to stay at home to watch a wide variety of program [...]

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