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Arts

This category contains 16 posts

Leonora Jackson: “A Name that Will Live in Musical History”

Although largely forgotten today, violinist Leonora Jackson was among a group of pioneering female classical musicians who broke down a number of barriers for women in the late nineteenth century. One of the first female American solo violinists to gain international acclaim, Leonora Jackson dazzled crowds throughout Europe and the United States with her virtuoso [...]

Through the Lens: Early Photography and the Cased Photograph Collection at the Maryland Historical Society

The Cased Photograph Collection in the H. Furlong Baldwin Library is a remarkable slice of photographic history. The nearly 600 item collection contains daguerreotypes, tintypes, and other examples of the earliest photographic technology. These photographs capture domestic scenes from Maryland life—family portraits, souvenir snapshots, and rare outdoor scenes. In 1839, Louis Daguerre introduced an invention [...]

Miss Szold: A Jewish Idealist in the Woman’s Literary Club of Baltimore

This summer, under the direction of Loyola University Maryland English Professor Jean Lee Cole, I was part of a group of students who transcribed documents from the papers of the Woman’s Literary Club of Baltimore held at the Maryland Historical Society. The club was founded in 1890 and disbanded in 1920, and over the summer, [...]

Green Mount Cemetery, John Pendleton Kennedy, and Elizabeth Kennedy’s Unusual Grave Marker

Green Mount Cemetery, dedicated in 1839, is a paradigm of the rural cemetery movement which transformed American burial practice.  Like other mid nineteenth-century reform efforts such as temperance, abolition, and women’s rights, it was an attempt to improve society. Yet Green Mount has not attracted the attention enjoyed by other early rural cemeteries, such as [...]

What we lost in the Fire

This past summer, I was one of five Loyola University students that conducted research on the Woman’s Literary Club of Baltimore. The club, which met on Tuesday afternoons between 1890 and 1920, was only a small part of the nationwide movement of women’s clubs to emerge after the Civil War. Most of them served as outlets [...]

Portraits and Paper Art — The Schröder Family at MdHS

The museum staff refreshed the Folk Art gallery several months ago and in perusing the newly installed pieces, this intricately designed paper cutwork immediately caught our attention. The delicacy of the work, coupled with the knowledge that a ten-year-old girl had created these mini masterpieces captivated our imaginations. Who was this child? Label copy identified [...]

The Wednesday Club: A Musical Soirėe

In 1858, German born musician and publisher Otto Sutro was a popular bachelor with an active social life in Baltimore. To reciprocate for the many social invitations he received, he invited his friends to Wednesday evening gatherings in his quarters at 67 N. Charles Street. These parties were so popular that more and more people [...]

The Newcomer Memorial Font: Art and Industry in Baltimore City

Baltimore’s long history as “The Monumental City” and current art culture means that there is an abundance of outdoor sculpture available to see. Although these public sculptures make the city’s streets rich with decoration, artwork that is placed indoors is sometimes overlooked. One such sculpture is the Newcomer Memorial Font (1902-1904) inside the Emmanuel Episcopal [...]

The Baltimore Chronicle: Baltimore’s Community Newspaper

In the late 1960s—late 1970s, a number of alternative and underground newspapers sprang up in Baltimore. These papers intended to fill a news void with coverage of subject matter—the counterculture, radical politics, local artists and musicians, avant-garde theatre, community news—largely ignored by mainstream publications, notably the Baltimore Sun and the Baltimore News-American. The publications ranged from cultural and literary magazines [...]

Staff Favorites: “President Lincoln’s head rested on this wall paper . . . April 14, 1865”

So wrote Henry Furgeson, beneath the scrap of burgundy and rose pattern wallpaper found in the Mary Ann Booth collection (MS 2125) during the research for the MdHS Civil War exhibit in 2011. This decorative paper lined the walls of Lincoln’s box at Ford’s Theatre the night John Wilkes Booth assassinated the sixteenth president of [...]

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