Sentinels of the Republic Collection 1922-1950, MS. 2451

Maryland Historical Society
Library of Maryland History

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Sentinels of the Republic Collection, 1922-1950
Maryland Historical Society

 

(Text converted and initial EAD tagging provided by Apex Data Services, March 1999.)
 

Sentinels of the Republic Collection, 1922-1950
Maryland Historical Society

Contact Information:
Manuscripts Department
Maryland Historical Society Library
201 West Monument Street
Baltimore MD 21201-4674
410.685.3750
Fax: 410.385.2105
library@mdhs.org
www.mdhs.org



Descriptive Summary

Guide to The Sentinels of the Republic Collection

MS. 2451

Maryland Historical Society

Baltimore MD 21201-4674

by

Susanne Elsasser

January 1980

 


Scope and Content Notes

The collection consists of two different parts: Section I refers to activities of “The Sentinels of the Republic”; Section II contains letters and speeches by its chairman, Thomas Francis Cadwalader, in his quality of private citizen.

Section I: Papers relating to “The Sentinels of the Republic”.

Arranged chronologically.

A pamphlet of August 1927 states in full the purpose of the organization, and gives the names of Alexander Lincoln as its President, of Thomas F. Cadwalader as its Chairman of the Executive Committee, and of Katharine T. Balch as its Secretary.

Material of the collection includes statements of policy, minutes of meetings, correspondence between officers, letters from officers to various political organizations, copies of bills introduced to Congress, newspaper clippings, lists of members. The Sentinels opposed especially the Child Labor Amendment No. 18, which was passed in Congress in 1924, but was not approved by enough States, and the Federal Aid Amendment No. 16 of 1939, which they considered an encroachment of the Federal Government on the States. In 1928, legislation concerning the Uniform Marriage and Divorce Laws were discussed, as well as the creation of a Department of Education. In 1939, drafts were written for a program of policies concerning Federal Aid and the Departments of Public Welfare, Social Security and National Defense.

In 1944, the organization was dissolved, and funds as well as written and printed material were remitted to Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, where the material was arranged and bound in ten volumes.

Section II: Letters and speeches by Thomas Francis Cadwalader, mostly letters to the Editor of “The Sun”.

Arranged chronologically.

The letters show the writer's disbelief in democracy, and his fight against the Federal Government taxing State and Municipal bonds. Some correspondence with the American Legion in 1923 concerns Child Labor. In other letters, prohibition is discussed.