MITCHELL-STUMP-MAXWELL-MAGRAW FAMILY PAPERS, 1806-1881, MS 3048

 

 

MITCHELL-STUMP-MAXWELL-MAGRAW FAMILY PAPERS

1806-1881

MS 3048

 

Special Collections Department H. Furlong

Maryland Historical Society

201 West Monument Street

Baltimore, MD 21201

Tel: (410) 685-3750

Fax: 410-385-2105

E-Mail: specialcollections@mdhs.org

 

Processed by Cathy McDermott

February 2004

 

Provenance: The Mitchell-Stump-Maxwell- Magraw Family Papers were donated to the Maryland Historical Society Library in 1994 with a supplement in 1996 by Katherine Magraw. Miss Magraw is the granddaughter of Katherine W. Stump and James Martin Magraw. This collection is the second in a series of collections relating to the Stump-Mitchell families. The first collection (MS 1948) was donated by Mrs. Lewis J. Williams in 1972. Photographs, ephemera, and books received as part of this collection were transferred to the appropriate library divisions.

 

 

Size: 1.5 l. ft. (2 document boxes and 1 oversized folder)

 

 

Access: Access to this collection is unrestricted.

 

 

Copyright: The Mitchell-Stump-Maxwell- Magraw Family Papers are the physical property of the H. Furlong Baldwin Library of the Maryland Historical Society.

 

Permission: Permission to publish material from the collection must be requested in writing from the Special Collections Librarian, H. Furlong Baldwin Library, Maryland Historical Society.

 

 

Preferred Citation: The Mitchell-Stump-Maxwell- Magraw Family Papers, MS 3048

H. Furlong Baldwin Library, Maryland Historical Society Library

 

 

Items Removed from the Collection: Sheet Music by J.N. Hummel, Ephemera, and Photographs

 

Biographical Sketches

MITCHELL

Abraham Mitchell – (1733-1817) was a prominent physician practicing around the greater part of Cecil County. In 1772 he married Mary Thompson. In 1781 he purchased 200 acres of land at Fair Hill, Cecil County and resided there with his family.

 

George E. Mitchell – (1781-1832) was born at Head of Elk (now Elkton), Cecil County, MD, on March 3, 1781. He was the son of Abraham and Mary (Thompson) Mitchell. He completed preparatory studies and graduated from the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia on June 5, 1805. He practiced medicine in Elkton, entering into partnership with his father. He was elected to the Maryland House of Delegates in 1808 and served until 1809. He was a member of the State Executive Council and served as president from 1809 until 1812. In the War of 1812 he served with the Third Maryland Artillery. He was presented with a sword by the MD General Assembly. He married Mary Hooper in 1816. He was elected the U.S. Congress in 1823, serving until 1827. He was an unsuccessful candidate for governor in 1829, but was elected as a Jacksonian to the 21st and 22nd Congresses, serving from December 1829 until his death in Washington D.C. on June 28, 1832. He was instrumental in inviting Lafayette to the U.S. as a guest of the government.

 

Jane E. Mitchell - Was the daughter of Abraham and Mary (Thompson) Mitchell and the caregiver of brother George E. Mitchell’s daughters after his wife died.

 

Mary Alicia Mitchell Stump – Was the daughter of George Mitchell and Mary (Hooper) Mitchell. She married John Stump in 1834.

 

George W. Mitchell- (1820-1850) was the son of George E. Mitchell and Mary (Hooper) Mitchell. He served in the Mexican-American War.

 

Henry H. Mitchell- (1820-1896) Was the son of George E. Mitchell and Mary (Hooper) Mitchell. He was a physician and served as Clerk of Circuit Court. He married Henrietta Getty in 1870.

 

Alexander R. Mitchell – (1835-1915) Married Henrietta Stump (1842-1900).

 

STUMP

Katherine W. Stump (Magraw) – (1846-1936) Was the daughter of John Stump and Mary Alicia (Mitchell) Stump. She married James M. Magraw.

 

MAGRAW

James Magraw D.D. – (1775-1835) Was born in Bart Township, Lancaster County, PA.. He studied languages at a classical school near Strasburg, and completed his classical and literary course at Franklin College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. He studied theology under the Rev Nathaniel Sample, pastor of the churches of Leacock and Middle Octorara, and was licensed by the Presbytery of New Castle, December 16th, 1801. After spending some time as supply at New London, Chestnut Level, West Nottingham, Fagg's Manor, Little Britain, Chatham, and Deer Creek, and as a missionary in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, he was ordained and installed pastor of the Church of Lower West Nottingham, Cecil County, Maryland, April 4th, 1804. During his pastorate, about 1810, the Upper West Nottingham Church was organized, and he became its pastor, giving it one third of his time, until 1821. In 1822 he became the pastor, for one third of his time, of the recently organized Church of Charlestown and continued to serve it until his death. He was Superintendent of the West Nottingham Academy, which he was instrumental in establishing. In 1825 he received the Degree of Doctor of Divinity from the Trustees of Dickinson College. He was a prominent and influential in Presbyterian Church courts. He was a member of the Convention of Ministers and Elders that met in Philadelphia. He was also a member of the General Assembly. He married Rebecca Cochran (1780-1831).

 

Jane E. Magraw – (1810-1826) Was the daughter of Rebecca (Cochran) and James Magraw. She was a student in Mrs. Saunders Seminary in Philadelphia.

 

Ann Isabella Magraw – (1817-1843) Was the daughter of Rebecca (Cochran) and James Magraw.

 

Samuel M. Magraw – (1809-1871) He was the son of Rebecca (Cochran) and James Magraw. He was a teacher at Nottingham Academy and was elected Principal after his father’s death, continuing until 1840. In 1843 he purchased a school called Baltimore High School. He married Mary Ann Maxwell (1807-1868) of Lancaster County PA.

 

Henry S. T. Magraw – (1815-1867) Was the son of Rebecca (Cochran) and James Magraw. He was an attorney living in Pittsburgh at the time of much of this correspondence. He married Emily S. Hopkins.

 

Stephen John Magraw – Was the son of Rebecca (Cochran) and James Magraw.

 

James M. Magraw – (1841-1889) Was the son of Samuel M. and Mary Anne (Maxwell) Magraw. He married Katherine W. Stump.

 

Adam R. Magraw – (1842-1907)Was the son of Henry S.T. and Emily (Hopkins) Magraw. He married Annie Harthorne (1849-1890). He died and was buried in Germany.

 

Rebecca C. Magraw – (1845-1865) Was the daughter of Henry S. T. and Emily (Hopkins) Magraw.

 

Scope and Content Note

The papers in the Mitchell-Stump-Maxwell-Magraw family papers span 75 years, from 1806 to 1881. The materials consists of correspondence, commonplace books, recipe books and sketches, which have been arranged within the framework of five series by family.

The bulk of the material in the collection focuses on the Mitchell and Magraw families. The Mitchell family correspondence mainly involves George E. Mitchell and the period of time between 1829 and his death in 1832. These are the dates during which Mitchell was a U.S. Representative for Maryland. He was living in Washington D.C at the time of the correspondence. In 1831 Mitchell suffered a neurological event which left him in poor health until his death in 1832. He addresses his poor health at length in his letters to family and friends. The majority of this correspondence is from Mitchell to his sisters who were caring for his daughters and to and from his children. None of the correspondence speaks about his activities in Congress.

The second major component of the collection is the Magraw family correspondence. Earlier correspondence consists of letters from James Magraw to his wife Rebecca. James Magraw traveled extensively in the Mid-Atlantic region because of his Presbyterian Synod and Assembly responsibilities. These letters give information on his travels and requests for family updates. The latter range of correspondence is many letters between his children, which gives news of family and friends.

In addition to the above, there is an exciting account of Alexander Mitchell when he was a blockade-runner for the Confederate Army during the Civil War. There is also two booklets which describe the Court Case which contests the will of Emily Magraw.

The family history preserved in this collection gives a perspective of society and the role of family in it during times that were historically significant. Both George Mitchell and James Magraw were prominent individuals in their fields. Unlike other correspondence, this correspondence focuses on their personal lives rather than their professional lives. It also demonstrates the importance of family and how difficult it was to be away from their homes and loved ones for extended periods of time.

 

See also the following related collections:

MS 1948 Archer-Mitchell-Stump-Williams Family Papers.

 

Series Description

The Mitchell-Stump-Maxwell-Magraw Family Papers consists of five major series: 1) Stump Family Papers 2) Mitchell Family Papers 3) Magraw Family Papers 4)Maxwell Family Papers and 5) Unknown Correspondence. The papers in this collection range from 1806 – 1981.

Each series is arranged by family and filed chronologically. All undated correspondence comes after the dated correspondence. Material such as common place books, genealogies, and recipe books come in front of correspondence in each series.

Series I: Stump Family Papers (1847-1860) (Box 1)

This series includes assorted biographical information, a Stump Family Genealogy, common place books, recipe books, and correspondence. The correspondence is largely made up of letters from George Mitchell to his sister Mary Stump during the Mexican American War. There is also a letter to Katherine Stump while she was a student at Belair Seminary.

 

Series II: Mitchell Family Papers(1806-1864) (Box 1)

This series includes a document about Alexander Mitchell’s adventures during the Civil War, A school book and correspondence. The large majority of correspondence is between George Mitchell and his family and friends.

 

Series III: Magraw Family Papers (1810-1881) (Box 2)

This series contains correspondence. The majority of the correspondence is between James Magraw and his wife Rebecca and later between the Magraw children. There is also court documents about the estate of Emily Magraw. Within this series (oversized folder) is also the first edition of the Baltimore Sun which contains an ad for the west Notingham Academy.

 

Series IV: Maxwell Family Papers (1824-1929) (Box 2)

This series consists of one folder, with checks, invitations and one letter.

 

Series V: Miscellaneous Correspondence (1835-1864) (Box 2)

This series contains correspondence, recipe books, and poetry, and botanical sketches. The majority of the correspondence the writer or the recipient can not be identified. This includes dated and undated materials.

 

Container List

BOX 1

1.0 Stump Family Correspondence 1847-1863

1.1 Letter addressed to Miss Kate W. Stump, Belair Seminary, report card for K. Stump dated December 23, 1863

1.2 Letter to Mrs. Mary Stump (Perryville, MD) from [Thomas Mitchell], her brother, Camp Near Tampico, Mexico. February 2, 1847. He speaks about his experiences in the Army

1.3 From [L.G.Mitchell], Fort Watson, Tampico Mexico to his sister Mrs. Mary A. Stump (Perryville- Cecil County), March 22. He says that he will be out of the service May 24th and will return home in June. He talks about the war in the letter

2.0 Biography Stump Mitchell

2.1 Newspaper clipping with picture of Perry Point’s ancient mill. “Built in 1750 by members of the Stump family at Perry Point, it is in still in good working condition” (Sun Staff picture), No Date

2.2 Paper Booklet, volume #6 , The Upper Shoreman, Cecil County on the Eastern Shore, October 1975, “The Mitchell House”, by Mrs. Cecil Ewing (article)

3.0 Stump Family Genealogy

3.1 Stump Family Burying Ground, typescript letter to Catherine S. Magraw asking for a donation to provide for the perpetual maintenance of the Stump family burying ground near Strafford, includes history of the burial ground. Not dated.

3.2 “Substantial Copy of Genealogical record of the Stump Family of Maryland”, compiled by Albert P. Silver and Henry Archer, 1891, Stump of Maryland, 56 pages of Stump family Maryland genealogy. Photocopy

4.0 Stump Recipe Book

4.1 Bound Book, Kat. Stump recipe book. No date

5.0 Stump Common Place Book 1860

5.1 Bound Book. “Mrs. John Stump” In the back of the book are recipes. If the book is turned around, the front is part of ledger of money received from August 6,1860

6.0 Stump Copy Books

6.1 Needle work copybook of Mary Stump, ‘Toilette Present for Ladies III’ (fragile).

7.0 Mitchell School Book 1816

7.1 Book, “Geographical Grammar” by A and J W. Picket, 1816. The name written in the book is Alicia Mitchell. Within the book are pullout maps of the United States and the world. The U.S. map has been colored in and outlined in color.

8.0 Mitchell Document Civil War

8.1 Typescript “Adventure of a Confederate Blockade Runner” by Alexander Mitchell. At the beginning of the Civil War Mitchell worked in Baltimore. He joined the Confederacy as a runner of medicine and served as an agent of the Medical Dept. His job was to get drugs in the North and smuggle them into the Confederacy. For the duration of the war he procured and carried drugs from Baltimore or New York through the lines to Richmond. This document tells about his adventures during this period. Not dated.

9.0 Mitchell Correspondence 1806 – 1819

9.1 Letter to Abraham Mitchell (Elkton) from E. Mitchell, , Baltimore, October 1806. Speaks about the death of an acquaintance and philosophizes about health and life in general

9.2 To Mrs. Jane Mitchell care of Col. Whann Elkton MD, To his sister from George Mitchell, Baltimore 1819 telling them that he will stop by and see them for a short visit

10.0 Mitchell Correspondence 1827

10.1 To Col. George E. Mitchell Elkton, Maryland from Alicia O. Mitchell (sister) Postmarked Philadelphia. Monday night Rhoschorcngh March 12, 1827, says that they are going to Spring Grove from PA. They are tired of town. They do not have much to occupy them and this makes them reflect on their desolate situation (moving to the country). They would like [Alicia] to stay with them in the warm weather. They want seed for the farm. Also wants to know the sex of the baby when sister has the baby, which is expected.

10.2 To Col. George E. Mitchell, Elkton from Alicia p.m.[sister], Philadelphia, April 10, 1827. Addressed “Dear Sister” Says that she is going into town for Holy Week and expresses pleasure at the chickens they bought

10.3 To Col. G. E. Mitchell , Elkton, from Alicia P Mallar , Spring Grove, Saturday April 28, 1827. Letter is from the sister of Mary ( Mitchell’s wife) which speaks about her sister’s death and the grief at not being able to see her before she died. She asks for a miniature of Mary, which Mary received, from an Aunt. She also asked for a lock of her hair for herself and another sister

10.4 To Mary Alicia Mitchell in care of Col. George E. Mitchell, Elkton from Mayacetta Tessall, Philadelphia, June 13, 1827. States that she is confined to her room and wants to know what is going on in the family

10.5 Tom J. Mitchell, Elkton, From Mayacetta Tessall (no date) refers to patterns she requested which were enclosed. Talks about fashions, fabric and lace

11.0 Mitchell Correspondence 1829-1931

11.1 Brochure addressed to George E. Mitchell, Fair Hill for Young Ladies, Boarding School in Newark Delaware under the supervision of Samuel Bell. It has a note on it from Wm. Whitely, May 3, 1829. Recommends sending Alicia (?) to him and letting her go with his children for a while. If he consents he should like her to come that week as school is starting

11.2 To Col. George E. Mitchell, Washington City, D.C., from (daughter) M.A. Mitchell, Baltimore January 11, 1831. Thanks her father for the good advice in his previous letter. Gives news of family and friends

11.3 To George Mitchell, member of Congress, Washington City, D.C. from A.K. Russell, Newark Delaware, December 12, 1831. (friend) he has heard from a friend that George Mitchell’s health is improving. Gives updates about mutual friends. Speaks about George and Henry’s schooling (children of George Mitchell) Says he attended a funeral of J. L. Miles’s son, his only child who was about 3 years old and reports that the parents are devastated. He asks to be remembered to Major MacKay

11.4 To Mrs. J. Mitchell, Elkton MD (dear Sister) from George E. Mitchell, Washington D.C., Dec 15, 1831. Writes to sisters saying that he is recovering from an illness. He thanks them for their kindness to his children

12.0 Mitchell Correspondence 1832

12.1 To Col. George E. Mitchell, Washington City from (son) George W. Mitchell, Henry W. Mitchell, New York, January 3, 1832 says that Uncle Russell received and the check to pay bills and says that the family is well

12.2 To “Dear sister”, possibly J.E. Mitchell in Elkton. From George E. Mitchell, Washington February 24, 1832. He thanks his sister for kindness shown to him and his orphan children. He hasn’t been able to write because of his poor health and being confined to bed and the weather is bad. He hopes to be able to go home when he is well enough and take care of his family. Says situation is very doubtful. Asks about family and friends

12.3 To J.E. Mitchell, Elkton from George E. Mitchell (brother) post marked the city of Washington, Washington March 16, 1832. He requests that his sister write to him about the family status

12.4 To Hon. George E. Mitchell, Member of Congress, Washington DC from Richard William Hall M.D, Baltimore, March 20, 1832. This is Mitchell’s personal physician who is asking for an update on his condition

12.5 To Hon. George Mitchell, Member of Congress, Washington City from A. K. Russell (friend) Newark Delaware. March 27, 1832. Provides words of religious encouragement. Mentions he is at the academy all day and at night he is at home or visiting the sick

12.6 To George Mitchell from C.S. McKim, Baltimore, April 5, 1832. Response to inquires that were requested by Mitchell. Speaks about the clothing needs of Mitchell’s daughter who has outgrown her clothes. Speaks about his daughter progress in the school. Gives an a breakdown of costs and the total amount due from Mitchell to the school for his daughter’s education

12.7 To Mrs. Jane E. Mitchell, Elkton (sister) from George Mitchell, April 20, 1832. Post marked City of Washington. States that he is not well, too sick to travel.

12.8 To Anne and Jane E. Mitchell, Elkton, Cecil County addressed “My dear Aunts”, from M.A. Mitchell, Baltimore May 5, 1832. Catches up on family news

12.9 To. J.E. Mitchell, Elkton from George Mitchell, Washington City, May 21, 1832 (brother), speaks about his health which has taken a turn for the worse. speaks about a liver ailment that his son Henry is experiencing

12.10 To Jane E.Mitchell, Elkton from H.R., May 21, 1832 from George Mitchell (brother), speaks about his ill health

12.11 To Hon. George E. Mitchell, Washington City from M.A. Mitchell (daughter), Baltimore, May 22, 1832, update on herself and family (grandmother’s family) and on school. Concerned about health of her brother’s family

12.12 To Col. George E. Mitchell, House of Representatives, Washington D.C. from A.K. Russell, Newark, Delaware (friend), June 4, 1832, update on family and friends

12.13 To George E. Mitchell, Member of Congress, Washington from A.K. Russell, Newark Delaware, (friend) June 8, 1832 He says that Henry (Mitchell’s son) is not improving. He went to get the doctor who made an incision in Henry’s navel and removed the discharge

12.14 To Hon. George E. Mitchell, Member of Congress, Washington D.C. from A.K. Russell, Newark Delaware, June 11, 1832 (friend). Speaks about Mitchell’s son Henry who had an operation and is much better. Also speaks about the death of a mutual friend, Mrs. Jordan

13.0 Mitchell Miscellaneous Correspondence Undated

13.1 From Kate, Perrypoint, April 18, to her brother, updates her brother about news and events of family and acquaintances. Comments on him coming home early

 

BOX 2 

1.0 Correspondence 1810 – 1821

1.1 “History of Harford County, Maryland” by Walter W. Preston “page 142” speaks about the early history of the land that became the home of Dr. James M. Magraw on Thomas Run. Not dated –typed

1.2 To “J” Rebekah Magraw, West Nottingham, “W. W. Evans” from James Magraw, Philadelphia at late hour Friday May 25, 1810 (from husband to wife). He speaks about an assembly which is in session and that is running longer than expected. So his return home will be delayed

1.3 To Rebekah Magraw, West Nottingham, Cecil County from James Magraw , “W Marlins Rockville, November 9, 1812. He speaks about his travels through Pennsylvania

1.4 To Mrs. Rebekah Magraw, Cecil County from husband James Magraw, Baltimore January 27, 1816 this letter tells his wife that he will be delayed in Baltimore and if his wife could go to the congregation and notify them of the delay

1.5 To Rebekah Magraw, Rising Sun, Cecil County from niece (?)Jane, Lancaster, September 10, 1821, also includes a letter to “Hannah” on the back of the letter. This letter tells about the death of Samuel Cochran after a bout of typhus fever. She talks about people in the family who are sick and her grief at Samuel’s death. The letter to Hannah says that she should return home

2.0 Correspondence 1822 – 1834

2.1 To Miss Jane E. Magraw, Miss Saunders seminary, Philadelphia from Robert Magraw (brother), West Nottingham Academy, January 22, 1823. A letter from brother updating his sister on family and friends

2.2 Letter dated January 17, 1825 addressed to Miss Jane P. Magraw, Philadelphia PA from brother James Magraw (West Nottingham). He tells his sister about the news and events since she left

2.3 To Reverend W. Magraw, Cecil County from Jane Magraw , letter to her parents from Philadelphia, January 18, 1825. She give an update on her school subjects

2.4 To Miss. J. E. Magraw at Mrs. Sanders Seminary, Philadelphia (W. Tho Williams) from (father) James Magraw, West Nottingham, February 9, 1825. This note asks her to make sure that she is diligent with her studies. Gives family and neighborhood news. He requests that she visit her cousin Jane Thomson and tell her that her brother Samuel Wilson at [Rockleen] buried his youngest child (John Thompson) yesterday

2.5 To Miss Jane E. Magraw, care of Mrs. Ann Sanders, Philadelphia from Robert and Ann Magraw (brother and sister) March 1, 1825. Gives news of family. Friends, and neighbors

2.6 To Mrs. Rebecca Magraw to the care of Rev. W. Magraw, Rising Sun West Nottingham Cecil County Maryland from (daughter) Jane E. Magraw, Philadelphia March 9, 1825. Updates on school activities. also asks for an update of friends and family

2.7 To Miss Jane Magraw at Miss Saunders seminary Philadelphia from brother James Magraw, updates on family and friends, news about marriages and comings and goings for West Nottingham March 11, 1825

2.8 To Jane Magraw, Rising Sun, Cecil County from Mary Anne Saunders, September 21,1826 Philadelphia. She is weak from her bout of bilious fever

2.9 To Anne Isabella Magraw care of Hy. G. Smymaker Esq. Margarita Furnace, York County PA from Samuel Magraw (brother) West Nottingham, January 30, 1829, writes on her birthday. Speaks about family and friends and about a great flood which did a lot of damage

2.10 To Mrs. Magraw from Ann J Magraw (daughter) Reading, November 6, 1833. Talks about shows of “wild beasts”, where she has seen leopards, tigers, gazelles and additional animals. She is at school and gives an update of how she is doing

2.11 To Miss Ann Isabella Magraw care of Mrs. Shaw, Reading , Berks County, PA. From Sam M Magraw (brother), West Nottingham, November 19, 1833. Tells her that their mother returned from a trip and became ill with “inflammatory fever”

2.12 To Ann Isabella Magraw care of Margaret E. Shaw, Reading, Berks County, PA from Samuel M. Magraw (brother), February 16,1834, West Nottingham, Updates his sister with news of family and friends. Mentions the birth of a niece to sister Mary Anne

2.13 To Rebekah Magraw, Farmington Post Office, Cecil County from Philadelphia, June 3, 1834 from James Magraw (husband). He is concerned about his wife’s (Rebekah) illness that he has heard about in a letter he received from family. He is writing a letter in the midst of a judicial trial

3.0 Correspondence 1835 – 1840

3.1 To Ann J Magraw, Margarita Furnace, York County West Nottingham, April 6, 1835 from James Magraw (father) Gives news of family and friends. He also reflects on his dead wife and asks Ann to make sure she is good to her only sister of her mother

3.2 To Ann I. Magraw, Margarita Furnace, York County, from James Magraw (father), West Nottingham, April 27th, 1835. Gives news about family and friends

3.3 To Mr. Samuel M Magraw, Farmington Post Office, Cecil County, from James Magraw (father), Pittsburgh, May 29, 1835. Speaks about the Presbytery Assembly, which he is attending, and some of the difficult cases they are dealing with

3.4 To Anne Isabella Magraw, Margarita Furnace, care of Mr. Slaymaker, Port Master, York County PA from James Magraw (father), West Nottingham, August 7, 1835. The letter speaks about “the fever” which is in the area. Speaks about death of [Maria] the day before. Talks about everybody getting sick and that he may be coming down with it as well. Asks her, the aunts and cousins not to visit until it is over

3.5 To Ann Isabella Magraw care of Rev. Dodge, Mount Joy,. PA from Stephen John (brother), Fort Deposit, March 13, 1838. He is busy in the store. Anne is studying hard. Informs her of Sammy’s marriage affair. Sammy (brother) was married the previous week in Philadelphia to Mary Anne Maxwell of Lancaster County. He wants her to remain at school that summer

3.6 To Ann Magraw, Margarita, York County PA. From Stephen (brother) Magraw, Port Deposit, February 12, 1839. Sends her 10 dollars at her request. Gives new of family and friends

3.7 To Ann Isabella Magraw, Hopkins and Magraw, Cheapside, Baltimore from Sam M. Magraw, Belair, December 12, 1840 Writes to let her know he has sent her trunk and where she can pick it up

4.0 Correspondence 1842 – 1844

4.1 To Ann Isabella Magraw, Hopkins and Magraw, Cheapside, Baltimore from Sam M. Magraw, Belair, December 12, 1840 Writes to let her know he has sent her trunk and where she can pick it up

4.2 To Anne Isabella Magraw care of Henry S. Magraw Esq. Pittsburgh PA. From Sam M. Magraw (brother) Baltimore, January 31, 1842. Gives news of family and friends. He wants to know when she will end her visit in Pittsburgh come back to Baltimore

4.3 Anne Isabella Magraw, care of Henry Magraw Esq., Pittsburgh PA from Stephen John Magraw (brother), Harve de Grace, August 10, 1842. Gives news of family and friends. Asks her about her journey to Pittsburgh and her stop in Bedford PA

4.4 Letter dated Nov 28, 1842, Harve de Grace from Stephen John (Brother) to sister. He responds to her request to attend school. The rest of the letter gives updates about family and friends (no envelope)

4.5 Letter to Mary Magraw , care of Samuel Magraw Esq., Baltimore from sister Ann, Pittsburgh December 5, 1842. Speaks about the birth of a baby in Pittsburgh . Updates with news about family and acquaintances

4.6 To Miss Ann Isabella Magraw, care of Henry S. Magraw Esq., Pittsburgh PA, from Stephen John (brother) January 23, 1843. Gives news of family and friends

4.7 To Ann Isabella Magraw care of Sam M. Magraw Baltimore MD, From Stephen John Magraw (brother), Harve de Grace, May 12, 1843. Gives updates on family and friends and where they are

4.8 To Ann J. Magraw care of Henry Magraw Esq., Pittsburgh PA. From Samuel M. Magraw, Baltimore, March 24, 1843 (brother). Gives news of family and friends. Speaks about the death of a neighbor who was a close friend. Speaks about raising funds to build a new Presbyterian church in Harve de Grace. Says he purchased a school known by the name of Baltimore high School (not a public school. He has 30 students and thinks he will be able to increase the number to 50. Mentions that his son was ill after being vaccinated

4.9 To Ann Isabella Magraw, care of Harry S. Magraw Esq., Pittsburgh PA from Stephan John Magraw (brother), Harve de Grace, March 27, 1843. He is sending her money. He says that he is glad that she has decided to come home from Pittsburgh. Gives news of family and friends

4.10 To Ann Isabella Magraw care of Samuel Magraw Esq., Baltimore from Stephen John (brother), Harve de Grace, May 22, 1843. Letter is in response to her letter saying she did not receive the 10 dollars he sent her. He talks about the fair which will be held and suggests that she come for it

4.11 To Ann Isabella Magraw care of Samuel Magraw Esq. South Exeter Street Baltimore from Stephen John (brother) Magraw December 19, 1843, Harve de Grace. Sends her 10 dollars and tells her he will be in Baltimore the next day

4.12 To Ann Isabella Magraw, Margarita Furnace, York County PA. From (brother) Stephan Magraw Harve de Grace, April 2, 1844. Sends her 10 dollars. Tells her that business on the canal has commenced and will be busy until next winter. Gives news of family and friends. Also mentions that he wants to change the name of the West Nottingham Congregation to Kirkwood. He mentions that people are angry and opposed to it

4.13 To Anne Isabella Magraw care of Samuel Magraw, South Exeter Street, Baltimore MD from S.J (Stephen John), Havre de Grace, May 16, 1844, sends her 10 dollars to buy summer clothes and tells her if she wants more she can write and request it. There is a postscript which says that John C. [Sann] was reinstated again much to the satisfaction of the citizens he had been suspended in consequence of the last railroad accident. Also there is a note acknowledging the receipt of the enclose

5.0 Magraw Undated Correspondence circa 1843

5.1 To (Mary ) Mrs. Sam M Magraw, Harve de Grace, Harford County from Ann (sister), Pittsburgh, August 23 (no year). Updates on family and friends. She asks about them going to Baltimore as Sam has rented a schoolroom

6.0 Correspondence 1845 – 1846

6.1 To Ann Isabella Magraw, Margarita Furnace, York County PA. From Stephen J. (brother) Harve de Grace, June 4, 1845, gives new s of family and friends. Mentions several deaths that occurred on board the steamship Susquehanna

6.2 To Ann Isabella Magraw, Margarita Furnace, York County PA, from Stephen John (brother) Harve de Grace, June 25, 1845. Gives news of family and friends

6.3 To Ann Isabella Magraw, Margarita Furnace, York County PA from Stephen John (brother) Harve de Grace, July 22, 1845. He is sending sister $5.00. Gives news of family and friends

6.4 To Ann Isabella Magraw, Belair MD, From Stephen John (brother), Harve de Grace, September 26, 1845. Give news from home that everyone’s health is improving

6.5 . To Ann. J. Magraw care of Rodger Magraw Cheapside, Baltimore from Samuel Magraw(brother) Belair, Harford County, February 1, 1846. He asks his sister about how James and family (? brother) got on for the first part of their journey. Gives news of family and friends. Says his school is prosperous

6.6 To Ann Isabella Magraw, care of Rodgers and Magraw, Cheapside Baltimore from Mary Anne Magraw, Cumberland,(sister) March 24, 1846, writes to her sister that she has just heard about the accident of Joseph Rodgers but hopes he is better. She writes that James had wanted her to write to send home Bessa and Robert. But she says that she is quite unwell. James had a cold but is better and is doing well in school but she thinks with Mr. Rodgers accident that the children are very much in the way.

6.7 To Ann Isabella Magraw care of Rodgers and Magraw, Cheapside Baltimore MD, from Stephen John (brother) Harve de Grace, April 2, 1846,. He sends her 10 dollars. He gives updates of family and friends

6.8 To Ann Isabella Magraw care of Rodgers and Magraw, Cheapside Baltimore, from Stephan John (brother), Harve de Grace, June 22, 1846. Says he has been quite sick for several days. He sends her 15 dollars. He speaks about her coming to Harve de Grace and living with Mrs. Ramsey

6.9 To Ann Isabella Magraw care of Samuel M. Magraw, Belair MD from Stephen John (brother), July 21, 1846. He speaks about a possible trip to Cape May for vacation and he tells her that he will send for her to come with them for a short vacation. The rest of the letter gives news of family and friends

7.0 1880 – 1881

7.1 Booklet. “The Magraw Will Case”, reply of Mr. Howard Munnikhuysen to the letter of Mr. John P. Poe to the Baltimore Commercial. 1881, (will of Emily W. Magraw) – Munnikhuysen was the attorney who prepared the will. Poe wrote an article in a newspaper criticizing Munnikhuysen’s handling of the will. This is the will of July 1873. The will was executed in Baltimore on October 1869 and probated in 1870. A caveat was filed in December 1870. Type written, undated.

7.2 Booklet, “In the Orphan Court of Cecil County – In the Matter of the estate of Mrs. Emily W. Magraw – answer of Adam R. Magraw to the Petition of Howard Munnikhuysen order of October 14, 1873”. To the petition of Howard Munnikhuysen asking that the order of October 14, 1873 revoking the letters testamentary of Adam R. Magraw and rescinding the probate of the pretended will of Emily W. Magraw should be vacated. This was filed by the solicitors of Adam R. Magraw. Filed November 1880The will had been set aside and annulled by the order of October 14, 1873. Munnikhuysen is asking for a reversal. The document is dated December 14, 1880, Cecil County

8.0 Undated Correspondence

8.1 Letter to Samuel Magraw, Belair from (sister) Ann, Baltimore March 4, (no year). She writes to her brother to update him on news of family and friends as she comes from York to Baltimore. She says that General Ramsey is going to Mexico and that she has heard that his wife is very upset with his going. She talks about her visit with her cousin Susan Cochran and Uncle Robert and Jane Anne

8.2 To Mrs. Samuel Magraw Havre de Grace from Anne, Margaretia, February 17 (no year), posted mar Wrightsville PA Feb 15, gives updates on family and friends

 

9.0 Correspondence 1868

9.1 To Miss Rebeca Magraw, care of Miss Higgens, Smith’s Wharf, Baltimore Maryland from B. Bemma August 14, 1868

 

10.0 Magraw Court Documents 1880 –1881

10.1 Booklet. “The Magraw Will Case”, reply of Mr. Howard Munnikhuysen to the letter of Mr. John P. Poe to the Baltimore Commercial. 1881, (will of Emily W. Magraw) – Munnikhuysen was the attorney who prepared the will. Poe wrote an article in a newspaper criticizing Munnikhuysen ‘s handling of the will. This is the will of July 1873. The will was executed in Baltimore on October 1869 and probated in 1870. A caveat was filed in December 1870., date written uncertain

10.2 Booklet, “In the Orphan Court of Cecil County – In the Matter of the estate of Mrs. Emily W. Magraw – answer of Adam R. Magraw to the Petition of Howard Munnikhuysen order of October 14, 1873”. To the petition of Howard Munnikhuysen asking that the order of October 14, 1873 revoking the letters testamentary of Adam R. Magraw and rescinding the probate of the pretended will of Emily W. Magraw should be vacated. This was filed by the solicitors of Adam R. Magraw. Filed November 1880The will had been set aside and annulled by the order of October 14, 1873. Munnikhuysen is asking for a reversal. The document is dated December 14, 1880, Cecil County

11.0 Maxwell Correspondence 1824 – 1929

11.1 Check dated July 28, 1824, “Cashier of the Bank of Maryland”, W. Maxwell pay to Abigail Maxwell, six cents a reward of merit, signed Isaac. Allen

11.2 A small paper with engraving. Is a request that Mr. Maxwell pays the bearer, Abigail Maxwell 6 and a quarter cents as a reward of Merit. Dated June 27, 1825. Signed J. Allen

11.3 An invitation to a ball addressed to W . John Maxwell, at Union Hall for John and sisters on Thursday February 5, at Dr. Richard T. Haugbey’s, “Washington Inn” Little Brittain, PA. dated January 19, 1829

11.4 Letter addressed to Robert Maxell ESQ. S.L. Tritton says he will be going to Philadelphia and will attend to any commands with pleasure, Little Britain, April 18, 1835

11.5 A letter addresses to Cousin Bob, Jan 28, 1929 from H.R> Maxwell. It is a letter, which gives instructions on strip staining and care of furniture

12.0 Miscellaneous Correspondence Undated

12.1 Poem titled “Hunted a Wife”, handwritten, author unknown

13.0 Botanical Sketches

13.1 Paper with print of a flower, colored, artist and date unknown, initials “M.A.M.’ in corner of paper

13.2 Paper print of wheat , colored , artist and date unknown

14.0 Miscellaneous Correspondence 1834 – 1864

14.1 Document 1835, James Presberg Dr. A list of various payments made for 1834

14.2 From James Buchanan, March 3, 1864” Wheatland, near Lancaster, Gives updates of family and friends and requests that a box of cigars be sent to him

15.0 Miscellaneous Recipes

15.1 Typewritten pages of recipes

15.2 Handwritten recipe for current wine

16.0 Needlework

16.1 “The Ladies’ Work-Table Book; Containing Clear and Practical Instructions in Plain and Fancy Needlework, Embroidery, Knitting, Netting, and Crochet.”

 

Oversized Folder

The first edition of the Baltimore Sun dated May 17, 1837. On the last page, last column, is an ad for West Notingham Academy, S.M. Magraw Principal, Cecil County.