Gorman Papers, 1872-1923, MS 706

Gorman Papers, 1872-1923


Maryland Historical Society
 

  

(Text converted and initial EAD tagging provided by Apex Data Services, March 1999.)
 

Gorman Papers, 1872-1923
Maryland Historical Society

Contact Information:
Manuscripts Department
Maryland Historical Society Library
201 West Monument Street
Baltimore MD 21201-4674
410.685.3750
Fax: 410.385.2105
library@mdhs.org
www.mdhs.org

 


Descriptive Summary

REGISTER OF THE GORMAN PAPERS IN THE MARYLAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY

MS 706

Maryland Historical Society

Baltimore MD 21201-4674

by

CYNTHIA H. REQUARDT

 


Scope and Content Note

This collection is largely the papers of Arthur Pue Gorman (1839-1906). They deal with his long political career as U.S. Senator (1880-99, 1903-06) and as Baltimore Democratic Party boss (1880s-1906). The papers consist of correspondence, a diary, speeches, and scrapbooks. There are a few letters of his wife Hannah [Donegan] Gorman (1837-1910), and letters and scrapbooks of their son Arthur Pue Gorman, Jr. (1873-1919).

 

 

 

Arthur Pue Gorman Papers

 

Gorman's papers highlight the workings of Maryland's Democratic Party machine, especially its decline beginning about 1903. Two issues which reveal waning Democratic Party regularity were the Panama Canal Treaty, 1903, and the Poe amendment to the Maryland Constitution which proposed to disfranchise Negroes and foreignborn.

Gorman was the minority leader in the Senate and a member of the committee on inter-oceanic canals when the Panama Canal Treaty was debated in 1903. He hoped to strengthen the Democratic Party for the 1904 elections by embarrassing the Republicans with an inquiry into the U.S. role in the Panamanian Revolution. Desire for the canal was stronger than Party loyalty, however, and Gorman had difficulties keeping his party members in line. This issue is discussed in the detailed diary (December 1903 - March 1904) Gorman kept during the negotiations. The diary only covers these

few months. It is in Box 2.

In 1905 Democratic Party regularity in Maryland suffered a defeat when Isidor Rayner, the Junior U.S. Senator, broke with the party to oppose the Poe amendment to the Maryland Constitution. This was an attack against Gorman as well as the Party since Gorman drafted the amendment. The amendment was aimed at restricting the franchise and had a grandfather clause and a literacy test. Rayner was urged to oppose the amendment by Baltimore Jews. This he did in October 1905. There is much about Rayner's treachery to the party: letters between Gorman and Rayner, newspaper clippings, and excerpts of Rayner's speeches (1890s-1904) which attacked Negro suffrage and which Gorman collected to prove how unreliable Rayner was. There is also a copy of the Poe amendment. These papers document a bitter and damaging intraparty fight.

Two other items deal with the Democratic Party. The Party's decline began with the 1897 election, and the collection includes Gorman's memorandum assessing the defeat and its effect on the Party. There is also an interview (1901) of Gorman concerning a new federal election law.

There is a smaller amount of material showing Gorman in his heyday. Letters in the 1880s are patronage requests, and there is a letter (1894) from Grover Cleveland asking Gorman's advice on appointments. Also included are copies (1885) of letters between August Belmont and Nathaniel de Rothschild. Belmont sent these letters to Gorman as proof that Belmont had not been angling for the British mission during the 1882 campaign. Other correspondents soliciting and/or advising were: Governors John Lee Carroll (1884-1905) and Elihu E. Jackson (1884-99), Cardinal Gibbons (1893-96), Paul Dana (1890), Edward Lloyd (1891), John Walter Smith (1894), Andrew Carnegie (1895-1905), I.Freeman Rasin (1895), W.C. Whitney (1895), Marcus Daly (1896, 1899), William Jennings Bryan (1896, 1900), Josephus Daniels (1901), Alton Parker (1904), and Murray Vandiver (1904).

Topics covered included: Tamany Hall (1890), the Force Bill (federal election law, 1890), Wilson-Gorman tariff (1894-95), campaign strategy in Maryland elections (1895, 1897, 1901, 1905), and in national elections (1896, 1900, 1904), the gold standard (1895), need for a pro-Democratic Party newspaper in Baltimore (1893), Theodore Roosevelt's dinner with Booker T. Washington (1901), erection of a Senate office building (1905), and an attack on reform leader Charles J. Bonaparte (1905).

The collection contains 7 scrapbooks (1883-1904) which appear to have been kept by Gorman. The clippings are filed by the paper in which they appeared and chart the reporting of the Democratic Party in the Baltimore Sun, American, News, and Herald. There is one scrapbook (1898-1903) of clippins about Gorman's career.

 

 

 

Hannah [Donegan] Gorman Papers

 

These papers (1906, 1910) are letters of condolence on her husband's death and a copy of the oration read at her funeral.

 

 

 

Arthur Pue Gorman, Jr. Papers

 

These papers (1906-1920) are letters of condolence on his father's death, a few letters concerning his political career, and 3 scrapbooks (1900-1920) of clippings about his political activities.

 


Container List

 

BOX 1

A.P. Gorman Incoming Letters

1872, 1884-1906, n.d.

 

 

 

BOX 2

A.P. Gorman diary

1903 December-1904 March

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman speeches

1895, 1900

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman interview re: election law

1901

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman memorandum re: defeat

1897

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman newspaper clippings

1890, 1900-1905

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman notes on Democratic Party platform

1899

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman [UNK] on Isidor Rayner speeches

[1905]

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman campaign literature

1904

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman list of Democratic candidates

1899

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman petitions

1902, 1903, 1904

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman autobiographical notes

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman photographs

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman estate papers

 

 

 

Peter Gorman contract to make carbines

1861

 

 

 

Hannah D. Gorman incoming letters

1906

 

 

 

Hannah D. Gorman funeral oration

1910

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman, Jr. incoming letters

1906-07

 

 

 

BOX 3

[A.P. Gorman] Scrapbook

1883

 

(Baltimore Sun)

 

 

 

[A.P. Gorman] Scrapbook

1887

 

(Baltimore American

 

 

 

BOX 4

A.P. Gorman Scrapbook

1896-97

 

(Baltimore News)

 

 

 

BOX 5

A.P. Gorman Scrapbook

1897

 

(Baltimore Herald)

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman Scrapbook

1899-1901

 

(Baltimore American)

 

 

 

BOX 6

A.P. Gorman Scrapbook

1899-1900

 

(Baltimore Sun

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman Scrapbook

1902-1904

 

 

 

BOX 7

Gorman Scrapbook

1898-1903, 1924

 

 

 

Congressional Record (Re: A.P. Gorman)

1943

 

 

 

A.P. Gorman, Jr. Scrapbook

1900-1911

 

 

 

BOX 8

A.P. Gorman, Jr. Scrapbook

1903-1910, 1919-1920

 

 

 

BOX 9

A.P. Gorman, Jr. Scrapbook

1906-1907

 

 

 

 

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